Amazing Animal Encounters



Every Saturday and Sunday
from Memorial Day through Labor Day
11:30am and 2:00pm

at World Bird Sanctuary Amphitheater
Admission is FREE!

Free, fun, family-friendly environmental education programs are presented by our naturalists, using snakes, parrots, birds and mammals to teach you about the amazing creatures that share our planet, and what we can do to help them survive.

During each 25 minute presentation you'll get to meet some of the animals that call WBS home and even see some fly!









Hey! There’s Nature in My Woods!

Join us for a leisurely 2-hour hike through our oak hickory forest to see what kind of nature is in our woods. An expert Naturalist will lead you on your hike - where you may see birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. Learn about trees, rocks and who knows what else! Each hike will be a new experience depending on the season and the creatures that we encounter.

Time:

Hike starts at 9:00am | Check-in at 8:30am

2015 Dates:

June 27, July 25, September 26, October 24

Cost:

$11 for adults | $9 for children under 12

Reservations required:

Please call (636) 225-4390 x 101 to make your reservation. Group bookings welcome!
Dress for the weather and don't forget your binoculars and camera!

International Migratory Bird Day

Restoring Habitat, Restoring Birds

May 9, 2015 • 9am - 1pm
at World Bird Sanctuary • Admission is FREE!

Activities:

  • 9:00am: Naturalist-led bird hike
  • 11:00am: Tour of wildlife hospital
  • Learn to use your field guide talks
  • Bird banding (throughout the event)
  • Field identification presentation that will include live red-tailed hawk, peregrine falcon, barred owl, screech owl, great horned owl and maybe others
  • Bird-themed snacks
  • Bird-themed gift sales




Learn About Peregrine Falcons


Name

Latin Name is Falco peregrinus: peregrinus means "to wander."
Commonly referred to as the Duck Hawk.

Description

Length: 16" - 20" • Wingspan: 3' - 3.7' • Weight: 1.6lbs - 2.5lbs
The Peregrine Falcon is a raptor, or bird of prey. Adults are slate colored - gray above, grayish buff beneath, a lightly barred breast, black helmet and a black tear stripe on their cheeks.. Females are up to a third larger than the males, but their coloring is relatively same. Juveniles are a dark brownish buff color above with heavy streaking underneath and attain most of the adult plumage during their second year.

Range

Once found across all of North America until pesticides such as DDT eliminated eastern populations; pesticide banning and captive breeding programs have helped with their recovery. Likes open country, cliffs and city skyscrapers.

Behavior

- Peregrine falcons are the fastest-flying birds in the world.
They have been clocked at diving 261 mph, with top estimated speeds of over 280 mph.
- Hunts by diving very fast from a high perch, using dramatic speed and swoops to catch prey in midair.
- Don’t build nests; lay 2 - 4 reddish, darker flecked eggs in cliff hollows, bare rocky outcrops, bridges or tall building ledges; 28 day incubation period by both parents; chicks leave the nest at 5 - 6 weeks.

Diet

Almost strictly birds up to the size of Mallard Ducks, sometimes large insects, very rarely small mammal

The Importance of Banding and Blood Sampling Peregrine Falcons


World Bird Sanctuary’s reintroduction program put over 80 captive hatched peregrines back into Missouri’s wild, and WBS continues to band babies produced by up to 5 pairs of wild parents in the greater St. Louis area.

We band and draw blood to gain knowledge on the species and our environment. The bands we place on each leg will be registered with the U. S. Geological Survey, so if the bands are ever seen or recovered, we will know when and where the chicks were banded and can draw some conclusions on the individual's movements, breeding situation preferences (if we see the banded individual at another nest), and of course age. For instance, if it wasn't for the bands the Portage de Sioux Energy Center adult Peregrines have on, we wouldn't know that the male (Coal) was banded as a chick by me in 2004 at Ameren Missouri's Labadie Energy Center, and the female was banded as a chick in 2006 at a state park in Minnesota.

DDT, the pesticide responsible for bringing the Peregrine close to extinction, would have been found and probably banned from use in the U.S. sooner if blood samples had been being taken in the 50's and 60's. Even though Peregrines were taken of the endangered species list in 1998 and are quite common now, taking blood samples when all is well allows us to monitor any other human produced chemicals that could be building in the environment. Chemicals in the top predators, which include birds of prey, will accumulate and cause problems more quickly because of a process called "Biological Magnification." For example, let's say that over a 2 week period a Peregrine eats 20 Stone Rollers (a small shore bird). If each of those Stone Rollers has a little of a bad chemical in them, that chemical is magnified, or builds more quickly in the Peregrine's system. Having the good fortune and ability to monitor a top predator's blood allows biologists to keep a very close eye on our environment, which in the long run, keeps the environment healthy for us.



Have a Question About Peregrine Falcons?  Ask Jeff!

Jeff Meshach is the Director of World Bird Sanctuary and was "hatched" and raised in New Jersey, and started with World Bird Sanctuary way back in 1985 as a non-paid intern. He was part of World Bird Sanctuary's first ever Peregrine Falcon release program in 1985, when the Peregrine was still an endangered species. Because of efforts by World Bird Sanctuary and many other organizations around the nation, the Peregrine was taken off the endangered species list in 1998.

Every May and June Jeff bands the Peregrine babies in at least 5 of the 7 known nests in the St. Louis area. Jeff considers his banding efforts to be one of the greatest privileges in the world. "Getting to put my hands on the fastest animal in the world, even for just a few minutes, is an unforgettable experience."

Email your question to Jeff! His response to your question maybe posted here!


Your Questions, Answered

June 24, 2015

I just looked at the web cam...that would be 2:58 pm, Wednesday, 24 June...and saw no birds. The web cam will officially turn off Thursday, 25 June, and I can only hope many of you can get a last glimpse of a baby or adult, maybe as it perches or flies by. Once the babies become accomplished fliers, at least in the sense of flying around the plant, landing nicely on any perch and flying at or after the parents as they bring in prey, they spend no time at the box. They just find more comfortable places to hang out and roost.

If one had the time, patience and permission to hang out near the box, they would probably get to see some spectacular and noisy flights from the kids. The youngsters will playfully fly at and with each other especially during early mornings and late afternoons, find shady spots to rest and sleep during the hot parts of the day, and of course fly at the parents, especially if they can see a parent has food in its feet. The first kid to the parent almost always gets the food, with spectacular mid air transfers, then the other kids will chase the kid that got the food. The parents will start to bring in prey that's not dead, teaching the kids that they must kill prey after it's caught with the feet. All falcons have a special notch on their upper beak, which is used to sever the neck of especially the larger prey items they catch. Peregrines can catch ducks that could be heavier then themselves, so strong feet aren't enough to kill prey that large.

Way back in 1985, which was my first year with WBS and the first year we released captive bred Peregrines off the Pet Incorporated building in downtown St. Louis, I was one of the several that watched the babies all day long. I have first hand experience of what one could see at the Portage de Sioux Energy Center about now. I took notes on my observations way back then, but some of the things I got to see still are etched in my mind, and I know I'll never forget them. On the very first day of the release, during the first awkward flight from one of the 2 males we released, I actually watched a pigeon follow right behind the young Peregrine, giving one the impression the pigeon was chasing the Peregrine! As the young predators started gaining flight skills, pigeons stopped hanging around the building. Somewhere close to Pet Inc. a pair of American Kestrels nested, and once they saw the young Peregrines, the kestrel parents relentlessly harassed the 2 boys. I remember the day the tides changed.

One of the Peregrines was on the top ledge of Pet, and a kestrel flew in, screaming its ke-ke-ke as it dove at the bigger falcon, seemingly missing the 3 times larger bird by inches. However, instead of the Peregrine jumping to the building roof to try to stay away from the attacks, it stayed in its place, leaning forward and keeping its eyes on the little dive bomber. A split second after the next dive, which took the kestrel below the Peregrine's position, the Peregrine launched itself, diving off the ledge directly after the kestrel. The kestrel immediately stopped its screaming, tried diving toward the ground, but quickly realized the Peregrine could dive way faster than it. In an aerial maneuver only a fighter jet pilot could appreciate, the kestrel slipped out from under the Peregrine dive. That didn't stop the bigger falcon, as a straight ling chase ensued. Again the kestrel quickly realized it was outmatched in speed, so it flew between metal bars of a Busch Stadium parking garage close by, and the Peregrine didn't follow. The kestrels never harassed either of the 2 young Peregrines again.

Yes, I wish I could be at the energy center now, watching similar things occur, but alas, I, like all of you, have jobs and family members to attend to. You can bet I'll cherish the memories of the 2015 nest camera, the banding day beating I took, holding the babies during the banding, and waiting to do it all again in 2016. Thank you all for your great questions, and on behalf of World Bird Sanctuary, Ameren Missouri and the Missouri Department of Conversation, I wish you a prosperous 2015.

Jeffrey S. Meshach
Director
World Bird Sanctuary

June 19, 2015

Hi All,
Three of our 4 chicks continue to hang around the I-beams and walkway gratings 20 or so feet behind the box. The forth chick took its first flight mid last week and has not been seen since. Ameren workers have looked all over for the bird, but cannot find it. Trying to find a bird of this size within an energy center as large as Portage de Sioux is the “needle in the haystack,” but I continue to hold out hope that the forth is alive and well. I believe he’s just hidden from our view, but is seen by the parents and being fed, like its 3 nest mates.

I just took a look at the web cam and saw one chick, but the camera can only move so far, and there are plenty of places on the level of the box and just below the box where the camera cannot see the chicks. They continue to move in and out of camera view, and Ameren’s camera man does a great job keeping our view on the action.

Over the week someone asked which comes first; do the parents leave or do the chicks leave the area? I’ll start by talking about hormones.
All the Peregrine parent nesting behaviors are governed by different hormones that are released from their respective glands by either the change in amount of day light or nesting events. For instance, the mother and father start courtship because of the increasing daylight throughout late February and March. The event of the first chick hatching sends hormones to the mother’s brain that basically say, “Even if a bomb goes off right next to the nest, you will stay, defend and take care of your kids.” The latter is the reason I took such a beating from mom when I collected and replaced the chicks on banding day, 3 weeks ago today.

To get back to the question, the fairly mild winters at our latitude and heat from the energy center make it so the parents can stay around the site (their territory) all year long. As the nesting time hormones within the parents stop being produced by their respective glands, the parents will literally start to fly at the chicks as if the chicks are rivals within the parent’s territory. If the chicks haven’t already struck out on their own, they will be “escorted” away from the plant. Don’t worry, though. All of what I’ve just mentioned usually doesn’t start happening until the chicks are accomplished fliers and can catch their own prey. Rest assured that even if the chicks all leave the nest box area today, I will still write one more Ask Jeff to update and say good-bye to all until next year’s adventure.

June 11, 2015

Hello All!

Before I get started I want to assure all that the camera is back on from the brief technical difficulties we had this morning, 11 June.

Do those chicks ever grow up fast!? As of today our 2 females and 2 males are 34 days old, give or take a day. As all can see, the white down on their breasts, legs and heads is rapidly falling off and being replaced by their contour feathers, which are of course in juvenile color. As the adults fly in try to get a look at the big differences in their colors compared to the youngsters. Our kids will stay in this color for about a year, then start the change to adult colors during their second summer. By the end of summer 2016 they may have some of the juvenile brown color on their wrist feathers, which would be the back of the wing near the outer bend. However, most of their body will be in adult colors.

The boy kids have on average another 11 days in or around the nest, and the females about another 21 days before they fledge, or take their first flights. However, a first flight, especially for the males, could happen any time. When babies of any species fledge, their first flight almost always takes them to the ground. It’s no wonder 60% to 80% of juveniles don’t make it in their first year, and I believe the majority of those die during the fledging period. When our bambinos go you can bet Ameren workers will be on the lookout for them. If they are found and seem to be in good health, they are taken back up to the platform close to the nest. As long as the parents can see them and visa versa, our babies will continue to get food from the parents for up to 6 weeks post fledging. It takes awhile to develop the flight skills necessary to catch another bird in mid air. Usually, if the babies come to the ground on their second flight, when they are approached by anyone they will fly away and get themselves out of harm’s way.

Someone asked how the babies get water. This is an excellent question! Bird kidneys are much more efficient than mammal kidneys, so the kids get all the water they need from the food they eat. After getting wet during rain events, they may also get a little water from preening their feathers. Another asked why the babies have their mouths agape so much. Birds don’t have sweat glands on their bodies, as most mammals do. You could probably imagine if birds sweated as we do, their feathers would be continually wet during hot weather, which would add unwanted weight and the salt from the sweat would probably ruin feathers quite quickly. So birds pant, which rushes air across moist mouth parts, and the ensuing evaporation cools the bird.

Someone else asked about nest cleanliness. Those babies eat a lot, and so you can imagine the nest can get quite messy with all that poop flying around. And boy, does it ever fly! Day active raptors have the ability to launch the poop quite a distance, and this ability helps keep the nest cleaner, especially with those raptors that nest on a platform of sticks. With our kids surrounded by wood on 3 of 4 sides, it’s easy to imagine a dirty nest. I’ll take an educated guess that baby birds have a very good immune system. Also, the pea gravel on the nest box bottom allows the liquid to filter down from the surface before it dries.


May 29, 2015: BANDING DAY

Banding baby Peregrine Falcons, which only comes once a year within a 2 week span, is like Christmas time for me. Being able to have my hands on the fastest creature in our world is like nothing else I do in life. To know that the information I place on and take from the babies could one day shed light on their migration patterns (or maybe chaos in the case of these birds), breeding behavior, or who knows what else, gives me the feeling I’m making a difference for our world’s wildlife.

Banding these particular baby Peregrines also makes me a little nervous. I’m always very careful when applying the bands and recording the numbers/letters for the Fish and Wildlife Service, but with these birds, with so many eyes peering at them on a daily basis, I triple my efforts to be careful with the balls of fluff.

I was made a little more nervous of this day because this year there was a new female. Sioux-Zee, the female from the previous 3 nest camera years, always yelled at me quite loudly as I was up at the nest box, and she would swoop in pretty close, too. However, she never struck me with her feet as she passed by. I wondered what would happen with the new girl in town.

I got a prelude to this “striking” question while standing on the platform 8 feet below the nest box. The grate we stood on is about 20 feet long by 10 feet wide and surrounded by steel I-beams, which always kept Sioux-Zee from coming in close to us while we set up ladders and harnesses. As soon as we got to the grating this year, the new lady didn’t mind flying within the I-beams, contorting her wings to slide through a narrow opening between beams, passing about 18 inches from us, then contorting again to slip through another opening to leave the I-beam cave. I started to sweat a little more upon seeing this.

So the moment came. Ladder and fall arresting devices in place, I climbed so my helmeted head went above the top set of I-beams, exposed to whatever would come. I didn’t wait to see/feel what was coming because I had a job to do; extract the chicks from the nest. I moved into position to reach the first chick, then I heard her coming. The bullet with feathers made the Doppler affect quite evident. This affect is when a speeding entity making a lot of noise at first is a whisper, then the whisper turns louder and louder until the speeding entity is closest, then the volume goes down as the item moves away. I can’t tell you how many times the up/down volume happened, but I can tell you the lovely lady struck me 12 times.

Never in my life was I so happy to have PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) on, which was in the form of a hard hat, safety glasses, and as added safety to protect my exposed neck, a piece of duck tape holding the thick collar of my jacket. Yep, now 1,002 uses for duck tape!

When extracting the chicks the Peregrine mommy hit me 4 times in the top of the helmet and once on the right shoulder. Some of the blows were harder than others, but each one was a new experience in cringing/craning my neck to position my helmet so the most hard plastic was between me and her voluptuous voice, which meant those big, yellow feet with the sharp-as-a-tack talons were on their way.

I gingerly removed each chick from the feather laden nest box (Peregrines eat almost strictly other birds, hence the plumes) and placed them in pet carrier, which was being held in place by an Ameren safety worker a few feet from me. Banding and the blood draw went perfectly. From each chick we extract a small amount of blood from a wing vein, so the blood can later be analyzed for genetic and chemical purposes. From the time I took the chicks away to the time I placed them back was about 50 minutes. Of course we don’t want the youngsters to be away from mom’s dad’s lair to long, so we stay efficient with our movements.

So now it was time to put the fat and healthy chicks back in their box. I wasted no time clicking into the fall protection, and got into position to put the kids back. Mom wasted no time in continuing her attacks, striking me 3 times in a row even before the carrier was handed up between beams so I could easily reach into it. A photographer, sitting on grating about 20 feet away, yelled, “Can you hold each chick up before you put it back?” I could not, for putting anything out and up higher than my hard hat meant it would be struck by mom, regardless if it was one of her kids or my bare hand. When mom is so intent on driving a threat away from her nest, she would not differentiate between her chicks or and anything else.

The last chick slipped from my hands and clumsily ran to the back of the box, turned, then stared at me, like the other 3 I’d already gave their freedom; clumsy now, but poetry in motion in a few short weeks. As always I wished them good luck out loud, then made my way back to the top of the ladder. During this time of exposure mom struck me 6 times in the helmet and another time on the right shoulder. Despite the attacks, which were completely justified, I could feel nothing but admiration for my attacker. I’m already looking forward to the beating next year.


May 21, 2015

Many of you asked when banding day will be. It will be Friday, 29 May. The chicks will be 21 days old, give or take a few hours. It's best to band the chicks between 20 and 25 days of age. First, you can already tell the males from the females at this age because of size. The females can be up to a third larger than the males, and each sex gets different sized bands, so it's important you can tell the difference between them. Second, the babies can't use their feet at all until after 25 days. When they have no strength in their feet, they can't grab the bander with their sharp talons or themselves. It's safer for all involved when they are still quite helpless.

Early today the person who works the camera sent me a video of one of the chicks swallowing a large primary wing feather that I believe was from a Mourning Dove. At this stage in a baby Peregrine's life, mom and dad tear prey into pretty small pieces so the babies have an easy time swallowing. However, the babies still have to swallow small, but most times sharp bones from prey. To us this may seem like it would hurt because it probably would hurt us, both going down the esophagus and in the stomach. All birds of prey have what is called a crop, which is a storage place for food just eaten before it's passed to the very muscular stomach. A bird's esophagus and crop are very pliable, so even the stout feather the chick swallowed today and any sharp bones slide right down. Within the crop digestion starts to take place, so even sharp bones get softened somewhat. Bones are ground to a fine pulp in the stomach. A bird's stomach is extremely muscular, and very easily handles anything that is passed to it from the crop. Also within the stomach a pellet of indigestible material, like feathers and fur, is formed, then regurgitated about 16 hours after the meal. I've seem my fair share of Peregrine pellets in my life, and in fact my daughter and I disected one last year. It took a microscope to find a full feather because the stomach mashes and grinds the prey feathers so well.

A couple asked about a feeding schedule for the babies. That schedule is whenever prey is caught by the parents. Sometimes it's just after first light, sometimes it's later in the morning, or any time in between dawn and dusk. Even the best of Peregrine parents sometimes have a hard time capturing other birds for themselves and their kids because those same prey birds don't want to get caught by a predator. Nature has provided those prey birds with camouflage, excellent eye sight and also evasive maneuvers to make it hard to be caught.

Another few asked why mom leaves the kids for so long now and why all the babies don't get fed at every feeding. As the babies get older, they start to regulate their own body temperatures. Mom doesn't have to brood, or keep them warm because they are keeping warm themselves. Also, if it does get cool, like 20 and 21 May, the kids just pile against themselves to conserve body heat.

Finally, someone noticed the third eyelid on mom Peregrine that all birds possess. This eyelid sweeps from the inside to outside corners of the eye and is transparent. It's called the nictitans, or nictitating membrane. It helps protect they eye when flying at high speeds and fighting with prey, and its transparency means a bird never has to lose site of its environment during any part of the day. If, say, a Northern Flicker closed its eyes for even a second during it daily activities, it could be caught and killed by, of all things, A PEREGRINE FALCON! And, yes, I've found plenty of Northern Flicker feathers in the Peregrine nests I've been to. Talk to you all next week.


May 5, 2015

Hello all! I just took a look at the female on the nest (9:35 am central time), and she is hovering over the eggs. She stays close but doesn't sit tight on warm days because she could get the eggs too hot, which would be bad for chick development. Peregrines and probably all other birds have some kind of temperature sensing something that tells them when to sit tight and when to keep some distance from the eggs. The Mali Fowl from southeast Asia have a temperature sensitive beak, which tells them when to take sand and rotting vegetation off the eggs (yep, they have another means of incubation!) or pile it back on. Maybe there are other birds in the world that have a temperature sensitive beak and we just haven't discovered this yet.

The eggs are due to hatch anytime now. I speculated 5 May, since the last egg was laid 5 April and Peregrines have a 30 day incubation. However, nature always throws curves into any incubation scenario, but hatch day/night should be very soon.

Someone asked the size of Peregrine eggs. They are about the size of a large chicken egg. Another asked what happens to the egg shell after the chick emerges. Sometimes you see pieces or halves of the shell sitting in the nest for a long time after hatching. Once the chicks get bigger and start moving around, usually the leftover shells get smashed and just disintegrate into the nest gravel. Sometimes Peregrine moms and many other birds eat the egg shells, or at least some of the shell. Producing eggs takes a toll on the female's calcium deposits, which are small spikes of bone (called medulary bone) that grow into the air spaces of a female bird's largest bones. Yep, the larger bones of all birds that fly are hollow, which is an adaptation for flight. Birds want to be as light as possible to cope with one of nature's most strenuous exercises.

Yet another asked if parent Peregrines help chicks out of the eggs. The parents don't help physically, but moms do make noises when they hear the chicks within the eggs peeping. These noises are thought to stimulate the chicks into breaking out of their eggs.

Everyone stay closely tuned! The babies are coming.


April 23, 2015

Usually the female incubates for 22-23 hours a day. This particular day she was gone 4 and a half hours.




Hello everyone! Last week I talked about how long the female will incubate the eggs compared to the male. He's definitely the back-up bird. Females will spend as long as 22-23 hours per day incubating the eggs. However, early this week the Portage de Sioux Energy Center person who works the camera looked at several hours of footage (high speed footage observation helps), and found that at least on a particular day, the female stayed away for much longer than normal.

On the day in question, the female left the eggs at 8:30 am. At 8:32 am the male, Coal, took over incubation duties. Four and a half hours later, at 12:59 pm, Coal left the eggs and at 1:03 pm the female sat back down on her clutch.

First, I want to address the minutes the eggs didn't have one of the pair sitting on them. Over the 3 plus seasons the camera has been trained on the falcon nest box, we've definitely seen the female not get off the eggs until the male is in the box. Then she flies off and the male incubates, with maybe 10-15 seconds with the eggs not being warmed. On these days, cooler temperatures play a large role. With a cold day (I'd guess 45 degrees F or less) happening, the pair switches quickly. The day I spoke of earlier in this segment was warmer. The temperature was probably in the 50's, and the sun was shining right into the box at 8:30, , making it even warmer where it counted. The 6 minutes the eggs weren't covered by a Peregrine body didn't matter as much because of those extra ambient degrees.

Why the female stayed away for 4 and a half hours is anybody's guess. Maybe the male didn't have prey for the female to take when she left the box, so she had to hunt for herself this day. The person who runs the camera speculated, "Girl's day out?" My analytical mind thinks no on that one, but above I did say, "anybody's guess."

A question asked over the week was about bird eyelids. As the female sits for hours on end incubating, she definitely dozes off, or at least seems to. When she closes her eyes, it looks like all the eyelid comes from the low side of the eye, instead of 2 eyelids meeting in the middle, like our eyes. I don't know the details of bird eyelids, but because I've spent thousands of hours with a raptor sitting on my gloved wrist, I've had a close look at what happens when a bird closes its eyes. In day active raptors there is somewhat of an eyelid on the top side of the eye, but a much larger one that comes up from the bottom. Day active raptors have a bony structure called the supraorbital ridge that sticks out and over the top of the eye. It's sort of like built in shade for the eye. Maybe because of this ridge a raptor's outer eye protection has to come mostly from the lower eyelid. Also, all birds have a third, transparent eyelid called the nictitating membrane, which is a transparent eyelid that sweeps from the inside to the outside of the eye. In the raptor world, taking your eye off the environment even for a blink could mean the difference between food or no food, or life and death. So, the transparent membrane allows the bird eye to be moistened and kept clear of dust while never losing track of what's going on around them.

Finally, I've had several ask if we will be naming the new female. Because things can change so quickly in the Peregrine world, with males and females replacing each other within a territory sometimes in a few hours, we have decided not to name the new female. Rest assured we were lucky to have SiouxZee for 3 seasons, and very lucky to have Coal for the last 4.

One more thing...babies should start to hatch around 5 May, so stay tuned!


April 16, 2015

Hello everyone! As I mentioned in the first Ask Jeff 2 weeks ago, we are now into the "dog days" of the Peregrine nesting season. Unless you are lucky to be viewing when the male exchanges incubation duties with the female, you will be watching the new female sitting on the 4 eggs for almost all of the viewing time, which is 7am until 8pm daily.

Two or 3 times a day the male will fly into the box, usually with prey, and the female will get off the eggs, take the prey item from the male and fly off to eat the item at a close by perch. It's quite comical to watch the male, being about a third smaller than the female, try to collect all the eggs under his body. He has to use the inside of his wings to cover the eggs, and usually you can still see part of an egg sticking out. Not to worry, though. The female usually returns in 15-30 minutes and resumes incubation.

For the full development of the eggs, it's important they have constant and consistent heat from either mom or dad 24/7, and of course the colder the temperature is when incubation occurs, the more consistent the heat must be. Birds have a higher internal temperature than mammals, with 103 to 105 degrees Fahrenheit the normal (we humans hover about 98.6 degrees F).

Also, you may be lucky enough to see the female turn the eggs, which could happen as much as every 30 minutes. The eggs need to be turned so the developing embryo doesn't stick to the inside of the shell. Over the 150 or so million years birds have been on the planet, egg turning probably began early and became an innate behavior (a behavior that just naturally occurs) for birds.

With the 4th egg of the clutch being laid on 4 or 5 April, sometime between the 3rd and 7th of May the eggs should hatch. I'm sure all us viewers are looking forward to that day.


April 6, 2015

Hello All!! As of 4 April the new female has her full clutch of eggs,which is 4. Now starts the "dog days," if you will. She will spend upwards of 23 out of every 24 hours incubating the clutch. Coal, the male for this and the last 2 seasons will fly into the box with food 2, maybe 3 times a day, give her the item, and she will fly off to a perch close by to dine. Coal being considerably smaller than the female (males are smaller the female with all birds of prey), will do his best to incubate for the several minutes she is gone. After finishing her meal and probably doing some preening (feather care), she'll fly back to the box and again switch with Coal.

With the last egg laid on 4 April, we should see the eggs hatching 4 and 5 May. As I mentioned in Ask Jeff last week, the female won't start sitting tight on the eggs until the second to last or last egg is laid, thus ensuring all the babies will be close to the same size when hatched. If she started incubating with the first egg, the first 2 chicks hatched would be so much larger than the last 2 or 3 babies hatched that the first 2 would out muscle the others for food, and the last 2 or 3 hatched would probably die.

Someone asked how to tell the Coal and the new female apart. Good question, for if you don't see them together as they are switching in the nest, it's hard to judge size of the bird that's in the box when you are looking. Both birds have the colored band on the left leg and the pinkish band on the right leg, so no luck distinguishing that way. Seems to me Coal has more black on his face behind and below the eye than the female, but still hard to tell.

Someone else asked if babies from previous years ever come back to the nest box they were hatched in. Because Peregrines live a relatively long life, yet become sexually mature as early as their second year of life, chances are any pair on a territory will chase away any Peregrine that comes into their nesting territory for years to come, including any birds hatched in previous years. With this in mind, it's probably safe to speculate in most cases those babies hatched in all the years we've had the camera on will be nesting somewhere else.

Finally, someone else asked if Peregrines mate for life, and if so, wouldn't it be safe to assume SiouxZee, the female from 2012-2014, would have died? Peregrines do mate for life, but from all I've learned from fellow banders over the last 2 months, it's not a perfect guarantee the same 2 birds will be in the same nest every year. Take the new female for instance. She's a 2006 hatch (I gave her stats in last week's Ask Jeff), so it's safe to assume she was on at least one other territory over those years, and laid eggs and raised chicks. What made her leave her previous nesting territory to take up residence in our nest box? That's too hard to speculate upon.

Just one more thing before leaving you until next week. In last week's Ask Jeff I made a mistake on SiouxZee's band number. Her colored band number is Black P over Green 43 (not 93). I'll write to you all next week, and keep those questions coming.


April 1, 2015
From Jeff: Hello, everyone and welcome to Ask Jeff and this year's nesting peregrine falcons! I am thrilled to be able to answer your questions. Let's get started.

- Welcome back to the 2015 Falcon Cam!

As many of you have probably already seen, there are 2 eggs in the box. In years past we started the Falcon Cam the first day we saw the first egg. This year, the new female threw us a curve and decided to lay her first egg last Saturday night/Sunday morning, when there wasn't anyone around to see what was going on. By the time we scrambled (no pun intended) and got the Cam up and running to the public (yesterday morning at 7 am central time), she had already laid her second egg. She won't sit tight on the eggs until the second to last or last egg of the clutch is laid, which makes sure the babies are close to the same size when they hatch. If she started incubating with the first egg, the first 2 babies would be so much bigger than the others that they would out muscle the younger babies when mom comes into feed them, and the younger babies would probably die.

I guess you noticed above that I said, "new female." That's right; SiouxZee has disappeared. Upon her disappearance there was some turmoil with acquiring a new female. Coal, the male of the past 2 years at least, is still the "man of the territory," but we've seen at least 2 other females. The first female we saw was a bird hatched at Ameren Missouri's Labadie Energy Center in 2007. However, this female was only seen for 2-3 days.

The second female seen was hatched in 2009 at a nest within Washington University's Medical School complex, just a few miles west of downtown St. Louis. This female was seen only once as she perched just outside the nest box.

The third female, and the one that is now the female of the territory, was hatched and banded in 2006 (the same year SiouxZee was hatched and banded in Iowa) at a place called Palisade Head State Park, in Minnesota. The new female's parents nested on a cliff, and a friend and fellow Peregrine enthusiast climbed to the nest and banded her and her siblings. Once we saw this new female, it still took almost 2 weeks before things settled down and she laid her first egg. We got some great video clips of her and Coal performing courtship displays in the box, her digging in the gravel with her feet as she created her scrape (the depression in the gravel where eggs will be laid) and moving gravel into different positions with her beak.

Yesterday, I received in the mail the Missouri Department of Conservation's "Missouri Conservationist" monthly magazine. Within there's an article about the nest box camera at the Portage de Sioux Energy Center, and also a great picture of SiouxZee as she was flying about the plant. On her left leg you can even see the band with the black field over the green field and the P over 93. We will never know what happened to SiouxZee. Yes, she could have died, but with the fact that the new female was hatched the same year as SiouxZee, there's just as good a chance she could be on a new territory, somewhere in North America, preparing to incubate her newest clutch of eggs. There is still so much to learn about the life of the Peregrine Falcon, but because of the nest camera Ameren Missouri, the Missouri Department of Conservation and the World Bird Sanctuary endeavored upon back in 2012, we are on our way to learning those secrets. From the time we started watching her in 2012, SiouxZee laid 14 eggs and successfully fledged 12 youngsters. I'll never forget the 3 times I climbed to the nest to collect her kids on banding day, and her very loud voice and big feet coming so close to me as she defended her children. Yep, I'll admit I was a little scared of her striking me, but also full of respect for her boldness and her kind.

If it weren't for those other brave and respectful souls, those Peregrine enthusiasts that risk climbing/crawling to Peregrine nests, placing bands on the babies and recording so many other bits of information on those fluff balls, we would know so much less about this fastest creature in the world than what we do now. If it weren't for those organizations that put so much time and money into nest cameras trained on so many species in our country and the world, we would know even less. My heart and thanks go out to all of you, and especially those that work the Portage de Sioux Energy Center camera and all the technical support that goes into its success. You know who you are.

Falcon Cam Highlights of Past Years

Highlights of Sioux Falcon Watch 2014

Peregrine Watch 2014 concluded with three chicks hatching and successfully fledging.
  
   

Highlights of Sioux Falcon Watch 2013

Peregrine Watch 2013 concluded with four chicks hatching and successfully fledging.
  
   

Highlights of Sioux Falcon Watch 2012

Sioux Falcon Watch 2012 came to end with all five chicks fledging in early June 2012.
  
   


Raptique Gift Shop

The Raptique Gift Shop is located at the Nature Center. The gift shop offers nature-themed apparel, books, jewelry, toys and much more! The Raptique On-Line Gift Shop offers a limited sampling of:    Music     Books     Art

Music


All Along the Watershed


All Along the Watershed CD
All Along the Watershed is the next step in the journey of the Raptor Project.

Missouri American Water is proud to sponsor this educational and fun CD with the World Bird Sanctuary. The music tells a fundamental story. We all live in a watershed. Watersheds can be huge or even small ecological communities. Water ties them all together to you will hear and learn about water and how we all have to protect it for our future and the future of wildlife.

And, it fulfills the mission of WBS. All donations will go directly to the project and proceeds from every CD sold will go directly to our Wildlife Rehabilitation Hospital to provide care of injured wild birds of prey.

The CD is available for purchase for $12 with a $3.00 shipping and handling charge.

Listen to CD samples on The Raptor Project page here





Save the Future


Save the Future CD
Thanks to popular demand, World Bird Sanctuary's house band, The Raptor Project, has released its first CD, Save the Future. It consists of original songs about birds, the environment and taking care of our planet.

After years of sing-a-long and Birds in Concert performances, many requests from teachers, friends and WBS visitors inspired the project. The collection is made up of 13 songs, encoded lyrics on the CD and teacher activity pages. This recording is for everyone; kids, parents, teachers, young and old will find it fun and educational.

And, it fulfills the mission of WBS. All donations will go directly to the project and proceeds from every CD sold will go directly to our Wildlife Rehabilitation Hospital to provide care of injured wild birds of prey.

The CD is available for purchase for $12 with a $3.00 shipping and handling charge.

Listen to CD samples on The Raptor Project page here



Books


Beak to Beak by Walter C. Crawford, Jr.


Beak to Beak
A book about Walter's musings on wildlife, conservation and life in general told through a collection of short, true-life stories.

The book is available for purchase for $10.





Art


Owl Prowls

Come over to the Dark Side and meet the amazing birds that exist by moonlight. Owl Prowls offer an exciting opportunity to learn more about the fascinating lives of owls. Join one of our Naturalists at our evening programs - a 30 minute presentation featuring live flying owls, followed by an easy night hike around our grounds as we try and find wild Barred Owls and Great-horned Owls who are busy setting up territories and finding mates for the winter owl breeding season!

When: Selected Evenings from November 2015 through March 2015
Time: Starts at 7pm
Admission: $15 per adult; $10 per child under 12.

Friends of World Bird Sanctuary receive a 10% discount. Groups of ten or more: $10 per person, regardless of age.

Reservations: call (636) 225-4390 extension 1
Owl Prowls sell out every year, with a long wait-list for rare cancellations. To avoid disappointment, book your Owl Prowl today!

Open House 2015: Honoring Walter’s Legacy

As temperatures cool down the activity at World Bird Sanctuary is heating up! Fall is in the air; the leaves are beginning to turn; and World Bird Sanctuary's Open House event is just around the corner! Open House coincides with the Fall bird migration - and this year at Open House, we are giving you a closer look at who our native birds might come across as they head south for the winter! That's right - it's a celebration of birds from the southern Hemisphere - where you'll get to meet birds that you won't find anywhere else in the mid-West!

When: 3rd Weekend in October
10:00am - 4:00pm
Admission and Parking is Free

It's All About What We Do!

Open House is your opportunity to learn first-hand all about World Bird Sanctuary and the work we do to save threatened bird species and their habitats. Special activities include:
  • Behind-the-scenes guided tours of our breeding barn, animal behavioral and training center and the wildlife hospital. These areas are closed to the public for the rest of the year.
  • Shows featuring live animals native to the southern hemisphere presented in our amphitheater three times daily, including: Red-legged seriemas, king vultures, flying macaws, talking parrots, bateleur eagles, tawny eagles and more!
  • Raptor Project concerts.
  • Free adult and kids activities.
  • Photo opportunity - have your photograph taken while holding a live owl!
  • Craft activity center for kids, and special kids programs featuring live animals!
  • Be sure to catch the bus to the "Lower Site" where you will meet special birds in our endangered species breeding program and our animal behavior and training center)

Junior Volunteer Program

Junior volunteers assist with the daily care and husbandry of animals in the Education and Animal Management departments. These activities provide young, aspiring naturalists an excellent opportunity to work with qualified supervision in safe proximity to the animals, while learning about conservation and animal care. Junior volunteers between thirteen and fifteen years of age are taught to handle a small variety of animals, and can begin training to handle raptors at age sixteen.

Junior Volunteer Requirements

• Volunteer for a minimum of eight hours per month.
• Attend a minimum of three volunteer meetings per year.
• Wear a World Bird Sanctuary uniform when working in the Education Department and follow all wardrobe guidelines.
• Have a current Tetanus vaccination.

How to Apply

Print and complete the Junior Volunteer application, and include two sealed recommendations with it; one from a teacher and one from a non-related adult. Recommendations must be sealed and signed over the flap by the author. If a prospective Junior Volunteer is homeschooled, both recommendations must be from unrelated adults, such as scout leaders, church group leaders, etc.

Mail your completed application with the two sealed recommendations to the World Bird Sanctuary Volunteer Coordinator. The documents will be examined to ensure they are properly completed and, if so, an invitation to attend the next Junior Volunteer orientation meeting will be sent to you. Late, or incomplete, applications will not be considered, and completion of an application does not guarantee a Junior Volunteer position will be offered.

Your application and recommendation documents will be reviewed after we have met each other at the orientation meeting. You will then be contacted if you have been accepted into the Junior Volunteer program.

Junior Volunteer Opportunities (13 - 17 years old)

Naturalist:
Assist the World Bird Sanctuary Education department staff with the care and husbandry of animals (birds, reptiles and mammals) housed in the Nature Center and the Environmental Education Center. Help maintain exhibits and displays, interact with World Bird Sanctuary guests by greeting them, answering questions, discussing points of interest found on site, and assisting in the gift shop. This position involves handling animals, working with the public and working outdoors.

Education:
Junior Volunteers have the opportunity to share their interest and passion for animals in our Nature Center, Environmental Education Center, and Bird Brain Library. Each area is open to the public and involves interaction with visitors.

Animal Management:
Junior Volunteers have the chance to work closely with a variety of birds and assist the staff with cleaning, feeding and training activities. This area is behind the scenes and rarely involves interacting with visitors to the World Bird Sanctuary.

Volunteer Program

You can make a difference! Our volunteer program provides incredibly rewarding and satisfying experiences across a broad range of areas and activities for dedicated individuals at least thirteen years old, including the unique opportunity to work directly with birds, reptiles and other animals. Volunteers donate their time, expertise and energy, without pay, and their contribution is absolutely vital to the success of the World Bird Sanctuary. Various positions are available for adult volunteers.

Adult Volunteer Requirements

Please be aware of several important considerations if you would like to be considered for our volunteer team. World Bird Sanctuary volunteers are an important and integral part of our workforce, and we ask all volunteers to treat their commitment as they would a regular job. Our staff and other volunteers will be depending upon you, thus it is critical that you arrive on time and inform the staff member responsible for your area in advance if you are unable to report for your scheduled day are critical.
Additional Requirements
• Volunteer for a minimum of sixteen hours per month.
• Attend a minimum of five volunteer meetings per year.
Become a Friend of World Bird Sanctuary.
• Wear a World Bird Sanctuary uniform when working in public areas and follow all wardrobe guidelines.
• Have a current Tetanus vaccination.

How to Apply

Complete an online application in its entirety, including the submission of a current resume and three completed reference forms. Upon receipt, review and approval by the World Bird Sanctuary Volunteer Coordinator, an invitation to attend the next volunteer orientation meeting will be sent to you via email. Incomplete applications will not be considered, and completion of an application does not guarantee a volunteer position will be offered.

Adult Volunteer Opportunities (18 years old and above)

Naturalist:
Assist the World Bird Sanctuary Education department staff with the care and husbandry of animals (birds, reptiles and mammals) housed in the Nature Center and the Environmental Education Center. Help maintain exhibits and displays, interact with World Bird Sanctuary guests by greeting them, answering questions, discussing points of interest found on site, and assisting in the gift shop. This position involves handling animals, working with the public and working outdoors.

Animal Care Technician:
Assist the staff in our behind the scenes areas with the care and husbandry of exotic birds, amazing raptors and breeding birds. Husbandry duties may include food preparation, assisting with animal training, general grounds maintenance, and cleaning and maintaining our facilities. This position involves handling animals and working outdoors, but does not require working with the public.

Rehabilitation Technician:
Assist the staff with the care, treatment, feeding, cleaning and medicating of birds undergoing rehabilitation at our avian hospital, and with the care and husbandry of birds housed in display enclosures. This position involves the handling of birds, working with the public and working outdoors.

Docent:
Share your passion for animals, the environment and the outdoors by interacting with World Bird Sanctuary guests at our various animal enclosures, the Bird Brain Library, the Visitors Center, or the Environmental Education Center. This position requires attending three Docent training classes.

Bird Banding:
Assist the Bird Banding Team with the ongoing study of on-site wild bird populations. This includes visual and auditory observations and mist netting songbirds. World Bird Sanctuary’s seasonal bird banding program is every Thursday, beginning in March through October. This position involves working outdoors, and with the public during some sessions. Volunteer space for this position is limited.

Clerical:
If you believe in the Sanctuary’s mission and enjoy animals, but do not wish to work with them, helping in the administration offices is an excellent way to volunteer. Clerical volunteers assist our administrative staff with answering phones, data entry, filing and other office duties.

Maintenance:
Do you love mowing grass, shoveling snow, or are you retired from a construction related field? We are always seeking volunteers to help with many different aspects of facility maintenance.

Birds in Concert 2015

Join us for our 2015 Birds in Concert series this August! World Bird Sanctuary’s in-house band, “The Raptor Project” performs songs from their popular children’s environmental education CDs while birds fly just inches over your heads. Fun songs include “Turkey Named Fred”, “Roadkill Shiver”, “What’s the Matter”, “Animal Noises” and others. “Raptor Project” performances are followed by performances by local artists such as Javier Mendoza and others. Games and giveaways from Whole Foods Market and St. Louis Sprout and About. Sponsored by Ameren Missouri.

When: Every Thursday evening in August
August 6th, 13th, 20th and 27th
7:00pm - 8:30pm
Admission and parking is FREE.
No reservations required.



August 6th: Raptor Project followed by Javier Mendoz
August 13th: Raptor Project
August 20th: Raptor Project followed by Fowl Play
August 27th: Babaloo followed by the Raptor Project


August 6th: Raptor Project followed by Javier Mendoza

Raptor Project
World Bird Sanctuary's in-house band, "The Raptor Project" takes to the stage to perform songs from their popular children's environmental education CDs. Fan favorites from the "Save the Future" and "All Along the Watershed" albums include "Turkey Named Fred", "Roadkill Shiver," "What's the Matter," "The Greatest Possum," and "Animal Noises." Learn fun and exciting facts about the animals we share our planet with as they share the stage with The Raptor Project! Audience participation is encouraged! Check Out Our Music Now!


Javier Mendoza
Javier has sold over 50,000 albums and has received many honors throughout his career, including “Best Solo Artist”, “Best Male Vocalist” & “Best Pop Artist” by the Riverfront Times Music Awards. He was also a finalist in the Independent Music Awards and was selected as a Budweiser True Music Artist. Javier has released 14 albums and shared the stage with such notable artists as Willie Nelson, Los Lobos, The Roots, Ben Folds and many more. His dedication to creating new and different material and his passion for live performance keeps bringing the fans back again and again. Whether he’s playing for 10 people or a crowd of 10,000, Javier makes each show unforgettable. The physical and emotional energy he delivers is truly amazing and must be experienced to be believed.

August 13th: Raptor Project

Raptor Project
World Bird Sanctuary's in-house band, "The Raptor Project" takes to the stage to perform songs from their popular children's environmental education CDs. Fan favorites from the "Save the Future" and "All Along the Watershed" albums include "Turkey Named Fred", "Roadkill Shiver," "What's the Matter," "The Greatest Possum," and "Animal Noises." Learn fun and exciting facts about the animals we share our planet with as they share the stage with The Raptor Project! Audience participation is encouraged! Check Out Our Music Now!


August 20th: Raptor Project followed by Fowl Play

Raptor Project
World Bird Sanctuary's in-house band, "The Raptor Project" takes to the stage to perform songs from their popular children's environmental education CDs. Fan favorites from the "Save the Future" and "All Along the Watershed" albums include "Turkey Named Fred", "Roadkill Shiver," "What's the Matter," "The Greatest Possum," and "Animal Noises." Learn fun and exciting facts about the animals we share our planet with as they share the stage with The Raptor Project! Audience participation is encouraged! Check Out Our Music Now!


Fowl Play
Enjoy Fowl Play as they cover popular rock and pop songs from the classics to recent hits! Started by St. Louis musician Jon Hutsler, Fowl Play is an "all-star" mash-up of local musicians that formed the band exclusively for performances at Birds in Concert. From "Rockin' Robin" to "Fly Like an Eagle", there will surely be a bird-themed song for everyone at this fun-filled, danceable performance!


August 27th: Babaloo followed by the Raptor Project

Babaloo
Winner of numerous songwriting awards for children's music, Washington, MO native Babaloo has thrilled audiences by the thousands with his high-energy humor. Every kid in the audience will have a chance to rock out so come and jam with Babaloo and the birds! www.babaloomusicandfun.com







Raptor Project
World Bird Sanctuary's in-house band, "The Raptor Project" takes to the stage to perform songs from their popular children's environmental education CDs. Fan favorites from the "Save the Future" and "All Along the Watershed" albums include "Turkey Named Fred", "Roadkill Shiver," "What's the Matter," "The Greatest Possum," and "Animal Noises." Learn fun and exciting facts about the animals we share our planet with as they share the stage with The Raptor Project! Audience participation is encouraged! Check Out Our Music Now!


Fete du Feather Gala and Auction

Fete du Feather

Join Us

World Bird Sanctuary invites you to join us for our 2015 Fete du Feather Gala and Auction taking place at the fabulous Sheet Metal Building - The Grand Hall on Chouteau.

Your support ensures our success and directly supports our mission and the programs and animals to which we provide care. Please join us for what is certain to be a night where SPARKS FLY and DREAMS SOAR!

When and Where

Saturday, May 2, 2015: 6pm - 10pm
at The Grand Hall on Chouteau

Cocktail Attire and Complimentary Valet Parking

Purchase Tickets Online Here

Standard Ticket: $150 each:
- $85.00 donation to World Bird Sanctuary
- Complimentary cocktails
- Seated dinner
- Live entertainment

Patron Ticket: $300 each
- Preferred seating
- $235 donation to World Bird Sanctuary
- Your name listed in the program as a Patron Sponsor
- Complimentary cocktails
- Seated dinner
- Live entertainment

Gala Table: $1500 each
- Table for 10 guests
- $850 donation to World Bird Sanctuary
- Complimentary cocktails
- Seated dinner
- Live entertainment

Patron Table: $3000 each
- Table for 10 guests
- $2350 donation to World Bird Sanctuary
- Complimentary cocktails
- Seated dinner
- Live entertainment

Watch Live Peregrine Falcon Cam Nest Box!

In partnership with Missouri Department of Conservation and Ameren Missouri, the World Bird Sanctuary is pleased to be able to bring you a live video camera on a Peregrine Falcon nest box. Watch a pair of peregrine falcons as they nest and hatch their chicks with our live video feed. The video runs from 7 a.m. - 8 p.m. CT each day.

The nesting box is securely located 168 ft. above the ground on the Ameren Missouri Sioux Energy Center scrubber stack and was constructed with a design from the World Bird Sanctuary.

Our Falcon family has set flight. The live camera stream was viewed more than 80,000 times and peaked at nearly 2,000 views per day in early April and May when the eggs were laid and the chicks hatched. Thank you for your interest in the lives of these amazing birds. See you next Spring!

Highlights of Sioux Falcon Watch 2015

Peregrine Watch 2015 concluded with four chicks hatching and successfully fledging.
  
   

2015 Update

The female of the pair from the last three years has gone missing. We don't know what happened to her and why she hasn't returned. However, the male from the last three years has paired up with a new female and they have already started producing eggs. The new female was hatched on a cliff and banded in 2006 at Palisade Head State Park in Minnesota. This is her first year with this male. It will be interesting to watch this new pair raise their babies!

June 24th: Falcon Cam 2015 has come to an end.
Read Jeff's goodbye to another great season!

June 15th: Captured video of the chicks doing some "Pre-Flight Testing!"
Watch the video here!

May 29th: Banding Day! Read all about this exciting day!

May 8th: 4 chicks have hatched! Watch the video of the first one here!

April 22nd: Captured photos of mom and dad taking turns to incubate eggs. Watch the photo video here!

April 2nd and April 5th: Four eggs have been spotted! The third egg appeared on April 2nd and the fourth on April 5th.
Watch the video of the male changing places with the female here!

March 29th and March 31st: Two eggs have been spotted in the nesting box! The first egg appeared on March 29th. Only days later, a second egg was laid by the female falcon on March 31th. Watch the video of the 2nd egg being hatched here!

Adopt-A-Falcon

All of the birds and other animals that call World Bird Sanctuary home are available for adoption, including our resident Falcons!
Your adoption helps to care for your animal for a year. Find out what else is included in an Adopt-A-Bird donation.

To adopt a resident WBS falcon click on the individual bird and complete the adoption form.

Sponsor an Eagle Flight

Sponsor the flight of a bald eagle at your next corporate event.

Sponsorship of a World Bird Sanctuary Bald Eagle flight at a public event provides your organization with a prestigious and highly visible opportunity for charitable giving and community involvement.

Our bald eagles have been on display or have flown
at a number of high-profile events, including:

  • St. Louis Cardinals Baseball Team Home Games
  • St. Louis Earth Day
  • Veteran’s Day Events
  • Tournament of Roses Parade
  • Boeing
  • Various Local, State & Government Events

Call or Email Now to Book Your Eagle Flight:

(636) 225-4390 or promo@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Northern Saw-whet Owl Banding Friend Program

Free with WBS Friend Membership

Are you a Friend of World Bird Sanctuary? Do you love owls? Are you interested in learning about bird banding? If you said yes to these questions then we have an opportunity for you!

Last fall World Bird Sanctuary joined Project Owlnet. Project Owlnet is an organization that works to monitor owl population trends by mist netting and by banding migrating owls, especially Northern Saw-whet Owls. The results are compiled and used to determine when and where these migrant owls are moving. For the first time in the history of our site World Bird Sanctuary trapped and banded Northern Saw-whet Owls in 2012. In fact over the course of the owl banding program the team trapped, banded and released a total of seven Northern Saw-whet Owls. Our team is going to be at it again this year and would like to invite World Bird Sanctuary Friends to join them and learn more about this important program.

To experience the trapping and banding of wild Northern Saw-whet owls you must be a Friend of WBS. Not a Friend?
It is easy to join us in our mission. Just click here to join!

Details about the Northern Saw-whet Owl Friend program:
Friends must preregister for this fun program by calling 636-225-4390 ext: 106.

Limited space is available on the following Thursdays: October 24th and 31st | November 7th, 14th and 21st
Time: Varies based on sunset | Age: 10 and up | Cost: FREE!


Due to space constraints this event is limited to one Friend and a guest of their choice. Please feel free to bring your camera but be aware for the owls safety flash photography is not allowed. Due to the nature of owl migration there is no guarantee that you will see a wild Northern Saw-whet Owl. This program is weather dependent and may be cancelled due to inclement weather. Every effort will be made to reschedule.

Dress for the weather and wear comfortable walking shoes. This program will be indoors as well as outdoors. For the safety of the owls no flash lights please, World Bird Sanctuary representatives will provide any necessary light.

Take a Virtual Tour of World Bird Sanctuary



Check Out All Our Videos at World Bird Sanctuary's YouTube Channel

Watch Our Behind-The-Scene Videos



Check Out All Our Videos at World Bird Sanctuary's YouTube Channel

Calendar of Events

For reservations call (636) 225-4390

Keeper Talks

When: Every Saturday & Sunday | 9am Admission: FREE!
Have you ever wondered? What do the birds eat? Where does the food come from? Where did these birds come from? Join one of our keepers as they do the morning feeding on our exhibit line, and learn about what we feed the birds, where they come from, and a lit bit about the individual birds that you will meet! Meet opposite the wildlife hospital or catch up with the walk on your own.

Amazing Animal Encounters

When: Every Saturday and Sunday from Memorial Day through Labor Day
11:30 am and 2pm | Admission: FREE!
at the World Bird Sanctuary Amphitheater
| Sponsored by Ameren MO

Free, fun, family-friendly environmental education programs are presented by our naturalists, using snakes, parrots, birds and mammals to teach you about the amazing creatures that share our planet, and what we can do to help them survive


Birds in Concert

When: Every Thursday in August • 7pm • Admission: FREE! | Sponsored by Ameren MO
Different performers each night. Live birds and free-flight demonstrations accompany musical selections. Pack a picnic to enhance the magic of our outdoor amphitheater.
For full list of dates and performances visit Birds in Concert 2015



Hey! There's Nature in My Woods!

When: June 27, July 25, Aug 22, Sept 26, Oct 24 • Check-in at 8:30am
Admission: $11 for adults • $9 for children under 12
Reservations required: call (636) 225-4390 x 101
Join us for a leisurely 2-hour hike through our oak hickory forest to see what kind of nature is in our woods.
For more information visit Hey! There's Nature in My Woods


International Vulture Awareness Day - IVAD

When: 1st Saturday in September • 9am - 1pm • Admission: FREE! | Sponsored by Ameren MO
Join us as we celebrate vultures with zoos and conservation groups around the world. Flight shows, kids activities, gifts and souvenirs!




Annual Open House

When: October 17th and 18th | 10am - 4pm
Admission: Admission and parking is FREE. No reservations required.
Sponsored by Ameren MO
Learn all about World Bird Sanctuary and the work that we do to save threatened bird species and their habitats! Behind-the-scenes tours of our breeding barn, animal and behavioral training center and wildlife hospital, which are normally closed to the public. See education programs featuring live animals presented in our amphitheater twice daily and children’s programs presented at Kid’s Corners twice daily. Free children’s activities and craft center. Giveaways from Whole Foods Market.

Owl Prowls

When: November through March • at 7pm
Admission: $15 for adults • $10 for children under 12
Groups of ten or more, $10 per person, regardless of age
Reservations required: call (636) 225-4390 x 1
Come over to the Dark Side and meet the amazing birds that exist by moonlight. Owl Prowls offer an exciting opportunity to learn more about the fascinating lives of owls. Join one of our Naturalists at our evening programs - a 30 minute presentation featuring live flying owls, followed by an easy night hike around our grounds as we try and find wild Barred Owls and Great-horned Owls who are busy setting up territories and finding mates for the winter owl breeding season!

World Eagle Day

When: Last Sunday in March • 10am - 4pm • Admission: FREE! | Sponsored by Ameren MO
Celebrate eagles from around the world. Learn about eagles through our fun activities and presentations throughout the day. Be sure to bring your camera!




International Migratory Bird Day

When: May 2016; 9am - 1pm
at World Bird Sanctuary | Admission: FREE!






American Hiking Society's National Trails Day

When: 1st Saturday in June
at World Bird Sanctuary | Admission: FREE!

Enjoy the outdoors with this family-friendly event and 3 different length trails to suit your pace! Naturalists with live animals will be at stations along each trail.



Free Music Download: Wonderful Bird Song

Now available for free download, the song that started it all 20 years ago! Wonderful Bird Song has taught bird basics in sing-a-long format and was the first song written by WBS’ Joe Hoffmann for the children’s sing-a-long program. Wonderful Bird Song has been heard by thousands of adults and children alike, both live and on the first The Raptor Project CD, Save the Future.

We hope you enjoy this download!
Download Wonderful Bird Song (right click and select "Save As").

Check out the full The Raptor Project albums here!

All Along the Watershed CD     Save the Future CD

Wildlife Hospital Donation


Treatment & Care

The rehabilitation of a single injured bird of prey costs up to $1000. Over 300 patients are treated each year at the Wildlife Hospital. The staff at the Wildlife Hospital begin the treatment of an injured bird of prey by stabilizing the condition in order to counter the effects of shock and stress caused by the injury. After the bird's condition is stable, the bird receives additional medical care from local charitable veterinarians. Tube feedings, daily medication, topical antibiotic applications and re-dressing of wounds are some of the daily treatments given.

Preparing for a Release

After the bird of prey is phyically well a program of physical conditioning begins. This often involves manipulation of the wings and feet to strengthen and stetch atropied muscles. The bird of prey is placed in a large flight cage that allows for flying long distances. Flying a bird of prey on a long nylon line in an open field is often used as well.

Want to Help?

The Wildlife Hospital is entirely funded by donations from the public. Help us give our patients a second chance to fly.

One Time Donation

Yes, I want to help with my one time donation of:

One Time Donation Any Amount

Sponsor a Release

Your contribution of only $150 helps our patients and gives you the opportunity to participate in the release of a wild bird of prey.
Invite family and friends to release a bird of prey at your home or nearby park. Celebrate a wedding, birthday, anniversary, family reunion, school or corporate function with this special gift.

Questions about Wildlife Hospital Donations or Releases? Call: (636) 861-1392 or email: credfern@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Games

Memory Game

Test your memory skills while learning about the different kinds of birds.  Every match you find will tell you more about your favorite birds.  See how many matched you can find!  You score points for finding all the matches as fast as possible.  How high can you score?

Puzzle Game

Try to complete each of four different bird puzzles!  Each puzzle is different every time you play.  See if you can complete all four.

Nest Box Plans

The primary mission of the World Bird Sanctuary is to preserve the earth’s biological diversity and to secure the future of threatened bird species in their natural environments. With the cooperation and support of small companies, corporations, foundations, and concerned private citizens who are dedicated to environmental protection, we work to fulfill this mission through education, captive breeding, field studies, and rehabilitation.

Today our world is witnessing episodes of extinction never before experienced in the history of mankind. Now more than ever, the importance of becoming aware of the problems facing wildlife is essential. The World Bird Sanctuary understands that we can insure biological diversity on earth only if humans learn to appreciate, understand, and support the roles and needs of each species. To this end the WBS, working in cooperation with Ameren Missouri, has initiated a nest box placement program to insure the survival of many songbird species. Within the past 20 years, the population of songbirds has decreased by 15 to 30 percent, depending on the location.

Today we face a tremendous challenge; protecting endangered or rare songbird populations from becoming extinct and pro-tecting populations of those still common species from becoming threatened. One way for private citizens to assist in the protection of habitat is by identifying and developing management strategies for high priority songbird habitat. You can also help by enforcing zoning regulations and by assisting in the purchase of easements. The construction and placement of nesting boxes is perhaps the most direct way individuals and groups can become involved. This is an especially unique opportunity because it allows private individuals to truly participate in the protection of species and in some instances in the preservation of endangered species. Conservation is not a philosophy, but a way of life that ensures continued life for songbirds and other species.

Bat House Plans

Erecting a bat house on your property provides a safe roosting area for bats. This bat house plan was designed by Minnesota DNR Wildlife Manager Earl Johnson. So it's called the "Johnson bat house. You can download this bat house plan and build your own, or you can visit one of the links below for information about where to buy one.

About Bats

There are more than 1,116 species of bats world- wide with new species being discovered all over the world, about half of these bats are currently at risk. Bats range in size from the smallest mammal the bumblebee bat of Thailand weighing less than a penny to the giant flying fox from Indonesia with a wingspan up to six-feet, equivalent to a male bald eagle. In the United States we have 46 species of bats in Missouri we have 16 species. The smallest two bats in Missouri are the Tri-colored Bat and Small-footed Bat weighing 4 grams with a wingspan of 9 inches. The largest bat in Missouri is the Hoary Bat weighing 35 grams with a wingspan of 16 inches. Bats belong in the order Chiroptera, from the Greek word meaning “hand-wing”. Bats are broken down into two groups Mega-bats and Micro-bats. Micro-bats make of 90% of bats. They have small eyes and most navigate using echolocation. All bats found in Missouri are micro-bats. Mega-bats are the fruit bats and flying foxes. They have large eyes, some have a keen sense of smell, and most do not use echolocation to locate food. Bats have amazing long life spans, the Little Brown Bat found here in Missouri has been known to live up to 34 years. The longest record for a wild bat was a Brandt’s Bat that lived 41 years.

Why Bats Are Important

Bat populations in the United States and Europe are currently being decimated by a disease called "White Nose Syndrome." There is very little known about the disease, but it causes bats to wake during hibernation and go hunting for food, which is not available. They therefore die of starvation. Bats are worth approximately $53 billion to the agricultural crop industry – eating tons of agricultural pests every year. This massive decline in bats will have a significant impact on the food industry – impacting consumers where they can afford least, with rising food prices, as farmers are forced to use chemical pesticides to preserve their crops.

Meet Our Resident Bats

You can learn more about bats in general, and meet World Bird Sanctuary's two resident Straw-colored Fruit Bats, Batty & Scar by visiting our Nature Center.

Learn More About Bats:

Bat Conservation International: www.batcon.org
The Organization for bat Conservation: www.batconservation.org
Year of the Bat: www.yearofthebat.org
Lubee Bat Conservancy: www.batconservancy.org
MO Department of Conservation: www.mdc.mo.gov

World Bird Sanctuary Gift Guide 2011

Shop Green this holiday season. We have unique and special gifts for those 'impossible-to- buy-for' people on your holiday gift list. And they help us achieve our valuable work saving wildlife too! Click on the links to purchase.

Buy-a-Brick

For those on your list that fall into the “hard to buy for” category, consider giving them a lasting gift – a brick to be installed in our amphitheater. Engraved with your holiday wishes or other sentiment, it is sure to touch hearts. Two brick sizes are available with the option of including a presentation gift certificate for gift giving. Brick purchases support the work of World Bird Sanctuary's Environmental Education Department.
To give the gift of an engraved brick. click here

Adopt-a-Bird

All of the birds and other animals that call World Bird Sanctuary home are available for adoption. Your adoption helps to care for your animal for a year, and adoption fees include:
• Certificate of Adoption with a full color photograph of your special animal
• World Bird Sanctuary sponsorship for one year
• One year’s subscription to our newsletter – the Mews News – printed three times per year
• Natural history and life history of your special adopted animal
• 10% discount on all World Bird Sanctuary merchandise in our gift shop
• 10% discount on all public programs offered at World Bird Sanctuary, such as Owl Prowls, Nature Hikes etc.
• Visiting privileges and photo opportunities with the special new member of your family
(just call ahead first to make sure they will be here on the day of your visit).
To give the gift of an Adopted Animal click here.

Return to the Wild

Take part in the release of a rehabilitated bird! Returning a bird of prey back to the wild can cost up to $1,000 in care and rehabilitation. Your contribution of only $150 helps our patients and gives you the opportunity to participate in the release of a wild bird of prey. Invite family and friends to release a bird of prey at your home or nearby park. Celebrate a wedding, birthday, anniversary, family reunion, school or corporate function with this special gift. The World Bird Sanctuary Wildlife Hospital is a cornerstone of the World Bird Sanctuary, and is entirely funded by donations from the public. Help us give our patients a second chance to fly.
Questions about Return to the Wild? Call: (636) 861-1392 or email: credfern@worldbirdsanctuary.org
To give the gift or a Return to the Wild click here.

A WBS Friend Membership

Your WBS Friend Membership includes:
• One year’s subscription to our newsletter – the Mews News – printed three times per year
• Reusable WBS shopping bag
• 10% discount on all World Bird Sanctuary merchandise in our gift shop
• Invitation to Friends-only events like Camera Day offering unique photographic opportunities featuring live birds of prey. Bring your cameras for rare shots of raptors in natural settings
• 10% discount on all public programs offered at World Bird Sanctuary, such as Owl Prowls, Nature Hikes etc.
• Invitations to members-only events held at World Bird Sanctuary
To give the gift of WBS Friendship click here.

Raptor Project CD's

For the youngsters on your list there is a selection of two audio CDs by our in-house band, The Raptor Project. Each CD is full of fun and entertaining animal and environment-themed songs with catchy lyrics and fun melodies that teach us about the wonderful animals we share our planet with. These CDs also contain printed lyrics and teacher activity pages. Enjoy songs such as “Mr. Frog Blues”, “White Pelican”, “Animal Noises”, "Turkey Named Fred" and many more. All proceeds from sale of CDs supports the Wildlife Hospital.
To give the gift of music click here.

Beak to Beak

For the book lover on we have “Beak To Beak" by Walter C. Crawford, Jr. – World Bird Sanctuary's Founder and Executive Director. This book is filled with Walter's musings on wildlife, conservation and life in general told through a collection of short, entertaining and sometimes hilarious true-life stories.
To give the gift of reading click here.

Any of the above items may also be purchased in person at the World Bird Sanctuary’s Nature Center, or call 636-225-4390 Ext. 0 for further information.

Free Stuff

Watch Live Peregrine Nest Box!

In partnership with Missouri Department of Conservation and Ameren Missouri, the World Bird Sanctuary is pleased to be able to bring you a live video camera on a Peregrine Falcon nest box. The box is located at Ameren Missouri's Portage de Sioux power plant in St. Charles County, Missouri. The wild Peregrine Falcon pair was successful last year, raising 5 youngsters.


Bat House Plans

There are more than 1,116 species of bats world- wide with new species being discovered all over the world, about half of these bats are currently at risk. Erecting a bat house on your property provides a safe roosting area for bats.


Nest Box Plans

Today we face a tremendous challenge; protecting endangered or rare songbird populations from becoming extinct and pro-tecting populations of those still common species from becoming threatened. The construction and placement of nesting boxes is perhaps the most direct way individuals and groups can become involved. This is an especially unique opportunity because it allows private individuals to truly participate in the protection of species and in some instances in the preservation of endangered species. Conservation is not a philosophy, but a way of life that ensures continued life for songbirds and other species.

Enviro-Education Programs

  Looking for something exciting and educational for your classroom, group or scout troup? Our enviro-ed programs will provide fun, entertaining, and sometimes hands-on education for your group. These educational programs cover a wide variety of wildlife and environmental topics Select a program below for more information.
Fur, Feathers & Scales
Wings for Tots
Wings for Seniors
Sing-a-Long
Bird Tales
All About Eagles Raptor Awareness
Creatures of Myth and Legend
Reptales
Rainforests Rock
All About Owls
Owl Laboratory
Prairie Preservation
Mammal Mania
Stripping the World
Extreme Ecosystems
Animal Armor
Avian Aerodynamics
Critters for Kids
Resource Nest Boxes
Additional Scout Programs
For pricing and availability call (636) 225-4390 or email: education@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Fur, Feathers & Scales

Fur, Feathers & Scales

Includes a visit with some of our friendly critters. Children can see and touch a live bird, mammal and reptile to help them learn the basics of what makes certain animals different from others. This program is great for daycare centers and organizations with active youngsters. Maximum group size: 30. Pre-school and kindergarten.






Wings for Tots

Wings for Tots

An innovative program that uses four different birds plus numerous touchable items such as eggs, feathers and wings. Wings for Tots teaches children through hand-on experience how and why birds differ from other animals and what makes a raptor unique among birds. Kindergarten through 3rd grade






Wings for Seniors

What makes birds of prey different from other birds? Allow us to show you the answer through the use of props such as wings, feet and feathers. Then meet some of our resident raptors in an up-close and personal environment.


Sing-a-Long

Sing-a-Long

An action packed program that combines live birds, learning and singing in a mixture of fun. It features original songs about birds in general, as well as specific songs about owls, vultures and parrots. Pre-school through 4th grade.







Bird Tales

A fascinating way to learn about birds through storytelling. These tales include Native American legends, Aesop's Fables and other exciting stories. An adventure for those who enjoy seeing live birds and hearing great stories. Limited Availability. All grade levels.


All About Eagles

Did you know that Ben Franklin wanted the turkey as our national symbol instead of the Bald Eagle? Get an up close and personal view of a Bald Eagle and learn the reasons it was chosen instead of the turkey. 3rd grade and higher.


Raptor Awareness

Raptor Awareness

Features birds of prey including falcons, hawks, owls and vultures. Not only will you see different species of raptors, but you'll also learn a vulture's secret weapon and how to identify a bird of prey in the wild. Sit back and enjoy an up close view as some of the birds soar right over your head! Be sure to ask about adding an eagle to your program! 3rd grade and higher.







Creatures of Myth and Legend

Separates fact from fiction about those animals that make you squirm. Discover the truth with our Naturalists and the live, creepy creatures that star in this program. Come face to face with misunderstood animals and discover how they are actually beneficial for humans. Don't be left in the dark! 3rd grade and higher.


Reptales

Reptales

Reptales is an interactive and exciting way to learn about reptiles. Using snakes, lizards, a raptor and tortoise, this program examines the benefits of having reptiles around and dispels the misconception about them. This program works best for a maximum of 150 people. 3rd grade and higher.






Rainforests Rock

Rainforests Rock

Focuses on issues confronting tropical animals such as destruction of the rainforest and illegal animal trade. During the program you will see many animals found in the rainforest. And will also learn how to make choices that will help save these fragile environments and the creatures living in them. 3rd grade and higher.







All About Owls

All About Owls

Over 200 different species of owls share our earth. Meet several of these different types while learning the importance of their existence. All About Owls gives you insight into those mysterious birds of the night. Combine with an Owl Laboratory for a truly educational and entertaining experience. 3rd grade and higher.







Owl Laboratory

Owl Laboratory

Owls have a unique digestive system. What they can't digest, they cough back up! Have a visit with a live owl to learn about them and why owl pellets form and how they can help biologists. Dissect a real owl pellet with the help of a Naturalist. Combine with All About Owls for a truly educational experience. All grade levels.






Prairie Preservation

The United States if the only country where prairies exist. This unique biome is essential for the survival of many different plants and animals, but 99% of original prairies have been destroyed. Encounter animals found in prairies and learn what you can do to help bring the prairie back from the brink of extinctions. 3rd grade and higher.


Mammal Mania

Biodiversity comes from bio meaning "action of living organisms" and diversity which means "range of variation." Biodiversity is therefore defined as "variation among organisms" and is essential for the survival of all living things. Let us introduce you to mammals that have evolved and adapted to different areas of the world according to their surroundings. 3rd grade and higher.


Stripping the World

What do ivory, fur and coral have in common? They are all things that are desired by humans. These are only a few of the wildlife items bought and traded illegally every day. In Stripping the World, meet some of our endangered stars to learn how and why these items are acquired and what you can do to help prevent future possession. 3rd grade and higher.


Extreme Ecosystems

The Earth consists of five major biomes: aquatic, forest, grassland, desert and tundra. Let an animal ambassador from each of these ecosystems take you on a tour of the adaptations they have developed to survive in their extreme environments. 3rd grade and higher.


Animal Armor

Animals defend themselves in a variety of ways, from deadly poisons to thorny bodies. In Animal Armor, you will meet animals with unique abilities to protect themselves. Learn how and why they possess these special traits. 3rd grade and higher.


All About Owls

Avian Aerodynamics

Ever wonder how a bird flies? In Avian Aerodynamics, you will learn the basic physics of how and why birds are able to soar through the sky. Flight demonstrations with different avian species aid in teaching these concepts. 5th grade and higher.







Critters for Kids

Critters for Kids

Want to meet more than just birds? Critters for kids, come face to face with a variety of birds, reptiles and mammals and learn how they interact with each other. Meet an owl and its prey or discover common Missouri wildlife. The choices and combinations are endless.







Resource Nest Boxes

Incorporate a Resource Nest Box into your classroom or scout teaching. Available for a nominal fee and a 2 week period. Each box contains activities and props for four different subjects:

Protect Our Planet

Conservation is the focus of this box through recycled crafts, posters, books and videos that teach children to become environmental detectives and much more.

Rocks Rock

Ten different specimen sets of rock, minerals and fossils as well as fossil replica kit, geology knowledge cards and geology books are included in this box.

Talon Tote

Birds of prey come alive in this box with life-size wearable wings, track and talon replicas, puppet shows, books and crafts.

Where We Live

The world's five major biomes are represented in this box through a puppet show, books, knowledge cards, activity booklets, games and videos.


Additional Scout Programs

Available 10am-3pm. $80 per 10 scouts. $8 per additional scout. Prices subject to change.

Cub Scouts:

Tiger: Earn 1/2 of a "Tiger Track Bead" or complete Achievement 5
Wolf: Complete Elective 13 or Achievement 7
Bear: Complete Achievement 5 or 6
Webelos: Earn Naturalist Badge or the "Forester" Badge

Girl Scouts:

Brownies: Earn Letterboxing Badge, Hiker Badge or Bugs Badge
Juniors: Earn Drawing, Animal Habitats or Flowers

Advanced Reservations Required. Call (636) 225-4390. Payment in full required at time of reservation.


For pricing and availability call (636) 225-4390 or email: education@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Governance

Click to verify BBB accreditation and to see a BBB report for World Bird Sanctuary

World Bird Sanctuary Board of Directors

Officers

President: John Kemper, Peckham Guyton Albers & Viets, Inc
Vice President: Scott Liebel, Ameren Missouri
Treasurer: Trent Tinsley, Enterprise Corporation
Secretary: Leon Ullensvang, Retired

Board of Directors

Bill Berthold, Frontenac Engineering Group
James Cook, Schuchat, Cook & Werner
Ann Dettmer, Missouri American Water
Harold Frick, Lockton Companies LLC
James Morgan, Subsurface Constructors
Joel Kichline, Raymond James & Associates
Terry Potter, Husch Blackwell, LLP
John Risberg, Maritz, Inc.
Thomas Rollins, Retired
Ryan Shaughnessy, Shaughnessy & Silles, LLC

Financials

Form 990 (2010)
Form 990 (2011)
Form 990 (2012)
Form 990 (2013)
Form 990 (2014)

Annual Report

Annual Report 2010
Annual Report 2011
Annual Report 2013

Privacy Policy

World Bird Sanctuary (WBS) is committed to maintaining your confidence and trust, and accordingly maintains the following privacy policy to protect personal information you provide online.

WBS's Commitment to Online Security

Physical, electronic and managerial procedures have been employed to safeguard the security and integrity of personal information. Billing information is encrypted whenever transmitted or received online. Personal information is accessible only by staff and volunteers designated to handle online complaints or requests. All WBS agents and contractors with access to personal information obtained on the WBS web site are also bound to adhere to this policy.

Personal Information that WBS May Collect Online

WBS collects the following types of personal information: names, postal and e-mail addresses, phone and facsimile numbers, billing information, and complaint information.

WBS may also collect business information from sole proprietorships that apply for membership or program participation, some of which might constitute personal information, as well as personal information from individuals acting solely in their business capacity.

How WBS May Use Personal Information Collected Online

WBS will not use your personal information other than for the purpose for which it was submitted without your consent. We use personal information to reply to inquiries, handle complaints, provide operational notices, and in program recordkeeping. We also process business and billing requests related to program participation. At certain points where personal information is collected on our site, there may be a box where you may indicate you would like to be on a list to receive information about other WBS programs and services and about ways to support WBS. At any time you can add or remove your name from our mailing list by contacting us at promo@worldbirdsanctuary.org.

How Your Information May Be Shared

WBS never sells or rents personal information.
We will release personal information to appropriate governmental authorities under the following circumstances:
  • Where release is required by law (for example, a subpoena) or regulation, or is requested by a government agency conducting investigations or proceedings;
  • Where our records indicate a company may be engaged in fraudulent activity or other deceptive practices that a governmental agency should be made aware of; or
  • Where your communication suggests possible harm to others.

Help Us Keep Your Personal Information Accurate

If your personal information changes or you would like to review the personal information we may have on file, please email us with the new information or your review request at promo@worldbirdsanctuary.org. Let us also know the department or WBS program that led to your submission of personal information so we may efficiently locate your information.

Computer Tracking and Cookies

Our web site is not set up to track, collect or distribute personal information not entered by its visitors. Our site logs do generate certain kinds of non-identifying site usage data, such as the number of hits and visits to our site. This information is used for internal purposes by technical support staff to provide better services to the public and may also be provided to others, but again, the statistics contain no personal information and cannot be used to gather such information.

A cookie is a small amount of data that is sent to your browser from a Web server and stored on your computer's hard drive. WBS uses non-identifying cookies to provide easier site navigation and access to forms. You can still use the WBS site if your browser is set to reject cookies. Our cookies do not generate personal data, do not read personal data from your machine and are never tied to anything that could be used to identify you.


Problems?
If you have a complaint about WBS's compliance with this privacy policy, you may contact us at promo@worldbirdsanctuary.org

How To Help An Injured Bird Of Prey

Approximately 300-400 birds of prey per year are admitted to the Kathryn G. Favre Wildlife Hospital at World Bird Sanctuary. An injured raptor requires immediate and specialized care and any delay reduces the bird's chances of recovery and subsequent release back into the wild. The World Bird Sanctuary Kathryn G. Favre Wildlife Hospital admits 300-400 birds per year. We are unable to do pick-ups or rescues do to staffing issues. We are open to accept birds from 8am to 5pm every day except Thanksgiving and Christmas Days. We accept all birds of prey (hawks, owls, eagles, vultures, falcons etc.) as well as herons, pelicans and swans. We do not accept songbirds.

If you find an injured bird of prey, follow these directions to safely capture it for delivery to World Bird Sanctuary
or download them here:

  • Before attempting to aid an injured bird of prey, be aware that a raptor's feet and talons are its primary means of defense. It is also capable of biting with its beak.
  • Get a towel, blanket, jacket or any other lightweight item large enough to cover the entire bird.
  • If possible, wear a pair of gardening or welding gloves to protect your hands and arms.
  • Approach the bird from the rear if possible. If the bird is alert and can follow your movements it may turn to face you, or flip onto its back with its feet in the air. Anticipate that it will struggle when first covered.
  • When close enough, carefully place the cover (jacket, towel, blanket) over the bird, making sure it is completely covered.
  • Quickly restrain the bird by tightening the covering around the bird. Scoop the bird and covering up together, and place into a cardboard box, animal carrier or other secure container. Keep the gloves on and securely hold the bird and covering away from your body to prevent accidental contact with the bird's feet and talons.
  • Do not remove the covering from the bird unless you are satisfied that you can get the covering off the bird without harming yourself. The bird may have grasped the covering in its feet – if so, leave the covering in the box with the bird, although not covering the bird.
  • If it is warm place the box or container in a cool place, as birds can overheat quickly.
  • Do not attempt to give the bird water or food, as both may complicate the injury, especially an internal one.
  • Transport the bird to World Bird Sanctuary. The Wildlife Hospital at World Bird Sanctuary is open for admissions every day from 8am to 5pm. If you find the bird outside of the hours, keep it in a dark, dry safe place until you are able to bring it to World Bird Sanctuary. Do not give the bird water or food.

If you find a songbird – Cardinal, Bluebird, Bluejay etc. – you can call Wild Bird Rehab at (314) 426-6400.

As always, if you are in any doubt and need further guidance, please call our Wildlife Hospital at (636) 861-1392 for more information or advice.

Under Federal and State law it is illegal for any person to injure or possess a bird of prey or any related items such as feathers, eggs or a nest. World Bird Sanctuary is fully licensed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the State of Missouri to rehabilitate, care for, house and maintain injured raptors.

What To Do If You Find A Baby Bird

During the Spring we receive many calls regarding young birds that have fallen from the nest. Some are in genuine need of our help, like the baby green herons whose nest was destroyed when a tree was felled and parents failed to find the makeshift nest. Others are baby birds that you may think need help, but don't always need our well-meaning 'help' – like the baby Barred Owl that was admitted. It was a fledgling and was spending time on the ground learning how to fly, while his parents still cared for him. Instead he had to learn how in a rehab. Follow the guidelines below to determine whether or not a young birds needs our help or download them here:

If you find a baby bird that has feathers, it's eyes are open and it is able to move away from you:

- The best thing to do is leave it alone! The parents will find it and continue to take care of it wherever it is. Baby birds do not leave the nest knowing how to fly. They initially fall out of the nest, and start clinging to branches or brush. The stay close to the ground for about 1-2 weeks, and start flying with short hops from branch to branch. The hops gradually get longer, until the bird eventually flies.

If the bird is in immediate danger of being attacked by a cat or dog:

- When possible, remove the cat or dog from the area until the bird is able to fly (1-2 weeks).
- Put the bird in a nearby bush, shrub or tree limb, out of harm's way. Most birds have a poor sense of smell, and the parents will not abandon a baby bird touched by humans.
- Don't stay in the immediate vicinity of the bird – the parents are probably watching and will not approach if you stay around.

If you find a baby bird with little or no feathers and you know where the nest is:

- Return the bird to its nest.

If the nest is destroyed, cannot be found, or cannot be reached:

- You can make one using a small basket or margarine container. Punch holes in the bottom and line the container with paper towel (not with grass, as moisture in the grass can cause birds to become too cold). Secure the 'nest' with duct tape in a branch fork near the old nest. The parents will find it. Check out our blog about a makeshift basketball net nest for a family of Cooper's Hawks last year.

If you are certain the bird is an orphan:

- When you are certain the parents have been killed, prepare to transport the bird to a rehabilitation facility. Carefully place the baby bird in a small open container linked with paper towel, and place both in a cardboard box
- Do not attempt to feed or water an orphaned bird. A bird's diet is very particular and they have a feeding schedule that must be followed.

If you are tempted to keep the baby bird:

- DON'T. Migratory birds, including songbirds, are protected under federal law. Possession of a bird, its nest or eggs without a permit is illegal.

Which rehab facility?

The World Bird Sanctuary's Kathryn G. Favre Wildlife Hospital admits 300-400 birds per year. We are unable to do pick-ups or rescues due to staffing. We are open to accept birds from 8am to 5pm every day except Thanksgiving and Christmas Days. We accept all birds of prey (hawks, owls, eagles, vultures, falcons etc.) as well as herons, pelicans and swans. We do not accept songbirds.

If you find a songbird – Cardinal, Bluebird, Bluejay etc. – you can call Wild Bird Rehab at 314-426-6400.

As always, if you are in any doubt and need further guidance, please call our Wildlife Hospital at (636) 861-1392 for more information or advice.

Whole Foods Market: One Dime at a Time

Shop at Whole Foods Market Town & Country in April, May & June 2011
to help World Bird Sanctuary!

Whole Foods Market

World Bird Sanctuary is the beneficiary of Whole Foods Market Town & Country's One Dime at a Time program for April, May and June 2011. This means that every time you shop at Whole Foods Market Town & Country, and take in your own shopping bag, you will be offered a 10c refund. You can then choose to have this refund donated to World Bird Sanctuary. It's a win-win! The environment wins – no non-biodegradable plastic finding its way into our waterways; and World Bird Sanctuary wins – your donated refunds will help us continue the important work in our wildlife hospital and endangered species breeding center.

We'll even get you started! When you shop at Whole Foods Market Town and Country between 12pm and 3pm on the following dates, you will get a free re-usable shopping bag from Whole Foods Market and World Bird Sanctuary (offer limited to first 50 visitors to the World Bird Sanctuary table on this day).

Saturday April 23rd 12pm – 3pm Saturday May 28th 12pm – 3pm Saturday June 18th 12pm – 3pm

We wish to express our thanks to Whole Foods Market for supporting World Bird Sanctuary through their One Dime at a Time program, and through their ongoing efforts to encourage us all to shop in a more environmentally sustainable way.

Avian Training Workshop

Avian Training

November 5 - 8,2015

This intensive 4-day workshop will cover many topics including: Establishing your own program - permits, insurance, facilities, staff & volunteers; working with and training your bird - manning and positive reinforcement, desensitizing; choosing the correct species to work with; transportation - crates, permits, driving, flying, shipping; housing - mews, jumpboxes, A-frames, flight cages, climate, hotwire, substrates; perch types - bow, platform, screen, etc. - which perch works best for what species; diets - food types, frozen vs. live, storage, prep, vitamins; training your birds for flying - weight management, base weights, target weights, flyer food.

Our staff believes the only way to learn is through the hands-on experience of doing things yourself. Therefore, at our workshop you will also: Make jesses, anklets, leashes; practice imping feathers; experience coping and trimming of a raptor; participate in simple public speaking games and learn how different elements make a difference; fly a Harris Hawk and/or Barn Owl with WBS staff; help train a new behavior with a White-necked Raven (continues through the workshop); "Be the Bird” in our training game; participate in emergency medical care and do a gross necropsy on a raptor.

Avian Training
The workshop also includes an extensive tour of WBS’ facilities and opportunities to see birds and housing up close.

Reservations required. Please call early - workshop has a minimum of 10 participants and a maximum of 20.

Workshop fee is $700 per person (this includes lunches) with a $100 non-refundable deposit due by 10/1/15, balance due by 10/15/15.
If registering after 10/1/15 the price is $800.

Transportation to and from St. Louis, hotel accommodations and breakfast & dinner are the responsibility of each participant. Cancellation policy - if participant cancels after 10/21/15, 50% of fee is non-refundable.


For more information on Avian Training Workshop: Call Cathy Spahn at (636) 225-4390 ext. 0 or email: workshop@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Year of the Bat

Year of the Bat

Celebrate Year of the Bat with Us During 2011


2011 has been named the Year of the Bat by the U.N. Convention on Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals and the Agreement on the Conservation of Population of European Bats. Year of the Bat is going to promote conservation, research and education of these amazing flying mammals.

Bats are interesting and misunderstood creatures. Learn more about the environmental and economic importance of these animals, the threats they face, and what you can do to help bats survive. Follow World Bird Sanctuary's Facebook Page and Blog for monthly information - interesting bat facts, bat house plans, and to find out what you can do to help bats survive.

Why is a Bird Sanctuary talking about bats?

World Bird Sanctuary is also going to participate by having some of our blogs dedicated to bat information and some additional displays about our bats and bat conservation at our Nature Center. We are going to work on promoting the conservation of these amazing animals by providing much needed education for one of the world’s most misunderstood and persecuted mammals. World Bird Sanctuary is participating in promoting Year of the Bat because bird and bat conservation are directly related. Many of the same issues and threats that birds face are also issues affecting bats. Three of these overlapping threats include habitat loss, pesticides and wind power. Throughout 2011 we be exploring each of these topics, along with many others. Follow Cathy Spahn's Bat Blog at http://world-bird-sanctuary.blogspot.com

Batty and Scar

About Bats

There are more than 1,116 species of bats world- wide with new species being discovered all over the world, about half of these bats are currently at risk. Bats range in size from the smallest mammal the bumblebee bat of Thailand weighing less than a penny to the giant flying fox from Indonesia with a wingspan up to six-feet, equivalent to a male bald eagle. In the United States we have 46 species of bats in Missouri we have 16 species. The smallest two bats in Missouri are the Tri-colored Bat and Small-footed Bat weighing 4 grams with a wingspan of 9 inches. The largest bat in Missouri is the Hoary Bat weighing 35 grams with a wingspan of 16 inches. Bats belong in the order Chiroptera, from the Greek word meaning “hand-wing”. Bats are broken down into two groups Mega-bats and Micro-bats. Micro-bats make of 90% of bats. They have small eyes and most navigate using echolocation. All bats found in Missouri are micro-bats. Mega-bats are the fruit bats and flying foxes. They have large eyes, some have a keen sense of smell, and most do not use echolocation to locate food. Bats have amazing long life spans, the Little Brown Bat found here in Missouri has been known to live up to 34 years. The longest record for a wild bat was a Brandt’s Bat that lived 41 years.

Meet our resident Bats

You can learn more about bats in general, and meet World Bird Sanctuary's two resident Straw-colored Fruit Bats, Batty & Scar by visiting our Nature Center.

Learn More about Bats:
Bat Conservation International: www.batcon.org
The Organization for bat Conservation: www.yearofthebat.org
Lubee Bat Conservancy: www.yearofthebat.org

Adopt-A-Mascot

Adopt-a-Mascot! Involve your students in raising environmental awareness while raising self-esteem as they learn the value of making a difference in the world. Through hard work and dedication students garner community support to help them raise the funds needed to adopt a World Bird Sanctuary mascot. With the contribution of each child, your students will reach their financial goal in no time! Ask about DISCOUNTS on programs in conjunction with your mascot visit!

Ask about DISCOUNTS on programs in conjunction with your mascot visit! All WBS creatures are available for adoption - ask for more details on additional raptors, parrots, reptiles and mammals!

$340


Eastern Screech Owl
American Ketstral

$365


Harris’ Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
White-necked Raven
Tawny Owl

$390


Peregrine Falcon
Red-tailed Hawk
Barn Owl
Great Horned Owl

$440


Bald Eagle
Golden Eagle
Eurasian Eagle Owl
Tawny Eagle

$525


Andean Condor*
*not available
for off-site visits

Your Adoption Fee Includes:

- Interesting and educational natural and life histories on your REAL, LIVE mascot
- 1 11”x14” photo of your mascot
- Adoption certificate
- 100 bookmarks of your adopted mascot
- Personalized environmental awareness poster
- 1 hour visit with your mascot (at your school or at WBS)
- Teaching tools that relate to your mascot, customized for your grade levels
- One year subscription to WBS’s newsletter “Mews News” (5 copies mailed to your program contact for distribution)

Your Adoption Fee Helps:

- Feed and care for your adopted mascot for one year
- Provide quality education programs and opportunities for today’s youth
- Increase awareness throughout the world of the importance of protecting endangered species and their habitats

Additional Opportunities:

- Bookmarks: $25 per additional 50
- Mews News: $1 per additional copy (includes ship-ping within continental US)
- Adoption visits within 50 mil radius of St. Louis - included; 50 - 100 mile radius is additional $100, over 100 miles please call for quote.


Questions about Supporters? Call: (636) 225-4390 ext. 0 or email: lmacleod@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Wish List

Here is a list of some of the items World Bird Sanctuary needs on a regular basis. These items can be delivered to our Wildlife Hospital or Nature Center any day of the week from 8am to 5pm.

Consumables:

  Liquid Handsoap - dispenser bottles & refills
  Toilet paper
  Sisal rope - 3/8 inch in diameter
  30 gallon trash bags
  AAA Batteries
  Bleach
  Dishwashing liquid
  Liquid laundry detergent
  Paper Towel
  Ziploc bags
  Reusable plastic containers
  Latex gloves
  General purpose floor cleaner
  Letter sized and legal sized laminating sheets
  DVD-R & DVD+RW
  Mailing labels - Avery 5360 or equivalent
  Distilled water
  CLR or other limescale remove
  Drain cleaner
  Listerine
  Cat litter - non-clumping
  Adams Flea & Tick Spray
  Duct tape
  Clorox or other antibacterial wipes
  Scotch brite Green Scrubbies
  Multifold hand towels for dispensers in bathrooms

Animal Care/House Items:

  Energy efficient light bulbs
  Kitten canned food - no fish/seafood flavor, no gravy or chunks
  Cat canned food - no fish/seafood flavor, no gravy or chunks Timothy Hay for rabbits
  Wild bird seed
  Cypress mulch (Cyrpress ONLY)
  50w infrared heat lamps for reptiles
  Ceramic heating elements for reptiles
  Old (or new!) towels, blankets and sheets
  Heating pads
  Digital Kitchen Scale
  Large plastic cat litter pans (new)
  Parrot toys
  Macaw cage
  Oxygen cylinders (sizes ‘t’ & ‘d’)
  De-humidifiers
  Spray bottles for water
  Box fans (4)

Office / Education Items:

  Digital cameras
  Paper shredders (4)
  Large paper cutter
  Portable vehicle GPS navigation systems (4)
  Television with DVD capability
  Large easels for displays
  Letter & legal sized white copy paper
  1st class stamps
  Gator clips
  Fiskars brand scissors

Outside/Maintenance Items:

  Welding gloves
  Leather gardening gloves
  Chain saw
  Commercial vacuum cleaners (2)
  Lawn mowers
  Weed removers
  Snow blower
  Leaf rakes
  Shovels
  Wheelbarrows

Vehicles:

  Four wheel ATV for trial work
  Four wheel drive with snow plough and back spreader
  Small trailer for hauling lawn mowers etc.
  Vans or minivans for transporting animals and people to education programs

Gift Cards:

  Office Max
  Wal-Mart
  Petsmart
  Petco
  Lowes
  Home Depot

Our Supporters

World Bird Sanctuary acknowledges those members of our community who have consistently provided us with in kind donations, pro bono services and funding in support of our mission.

 

Ameren WaterLogo
 
Ameren Illinois Edward Jones
 
St. Louis Hills Veterinary Clinic
 
Bloomsdale Excavating Bussen Quarries
 
CAW Ceres
 
Cummings Welding David Mason
 
Earthshare Missouri Frontenac Engineering
 
Husch Blackwell Intren
 
Kathryn G. Favre Foundation Maritz
 
PGAV Renewal
 
S3 Media Subsurface Constructors
 
Thompson Coburn Whole Foods
 
Wild Delight Winter Brothers

Application Submitted


Thank you for your application. A confirmation will be sent to the email address provided in your application.

Donate

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Help World Bird Sanctuary save endangered bird species and their habitats today by making a one-time donation, or setting up a recurring monthly gift through PayPal.

One Time Donation

Yes, I want to help with my one time donation of:

One Time Donation Any Amount

Recurring Monthly Donation

Monthly automated donations through PayPal make budgeting easy! You can help the World Bird Sanctuary to achieve our goals while sticking to your giving budget.

$10 Monthly Donation

$20 Monthly Donation

$50 Monthly Donation

$100 Monthly Donation



This option is only available through a PayPal account. If you do not have a PayPal account you can sign up here www.paypal.com Your monthly donation will be deducted through PayPal. There is no contract - you can cancel this subscription at any time through your PayPal account.

Join E-Scrip Free

Every Purchase Counts

World Bird Sanctuary can benefit every time you shop at Schnucks. Sign-up for an e-Scrip card, and Schnucks will donate up to 3% of every dollar you spend to World Bird Sanctuary. There is no cost to you!

You can get an e-Scrip card at any Schnucks store and activate it with World Bird Sanctuary as your beneficiary.

Fill out on-line www.escrip.com
Or download the form and we will send you one – it couldn’t be easier!

 


Questions about E-scrip? Call: (636) 225-4390 ext. 102 or email: credfern@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Planned Giving

Leave a Meaningful Legacy

World Bird Sanctuary receives no state or federal funding and relies entirely on donations from members of the public to achieve our mission. You can help World Bird Sanctuary to continue to successfully achieve our mission through planned estate giving. Your legacy gift will make a permanent statement of your philanthropic values. Your donation will help us to achieve our mission by engaging young Americans in responsible environmental stewardship for the world’s future generations through our environmental education and protection efforts.

Benefits Include:


  • Making a contribution to a stable, economically sound and credible organization.
  • The satisfaction of knowing that your contribution will make a difference to the future generations of Americans that will be responsible for managing and protecting our planet.
  • Possible savings on federal estate taxes.
  • The freedom to change your mind and your bequest at any time.

At the forefront of developing future generations of personally responsible young Americans, the World Bird Sanctuary encourages them to make decisions that lead to thoughtful earthstewardship and management of natural resources. As an acknowledged leader in the fields of environmental education and raptor rehabilitation, the World Bird Sanctuary is considered to be the best center of its kind in the United States.

We have over 30 years of success in achieving our mission through our four focus areas, and numerous accolades and awards for our achievements in wildlife conservation and education. The World Bird Sanctuary is a consistently successful and credible conservation organization, which makes investing in us one of the safest strategic decisions you can make.


Questions about Planned Giving? Call: (636) 225-4390 ext. 102 or email: credfern@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Thank You!

Thank you for your support!

Your transaction has been completed,and a receipt for your purchase has been emailed to you.

You may log into your account at www..paypal.com to view details of this transaction.

The Raptor Project CDs

All Along the Watershed CD
Save the Future CD

All Along the Watershed


All Along the Watershed CD
All Along the Watershed is the next step in the journey of the Raptor Project.

Missouri American Water is proud to sponsor this educational and fun CD with the World Bird Sanctuary. The music tells a fundamental story. We all live in a watershed. Watersheds can be huge or even small ecological communities. Water ties them all together and you will hear and learn about water and how we all have to protect it for our future and the future of wildlife.

And, it fulfills the mission of WBS. All donations will go directly to the project and proceeds from every CD sold will go directly to our Wildlife Rehabilitation Hospital to provide care of injured wild birds of prey.

The CD is available for purchase for $12 with a $3.00 shipping and handling charge.

TrackSample (click to play)
Clean Water
Mr. Frog Blues
The Greatest Opossum
The Parrot Song
White Pelican
All Along the Watershed
Bird in My Backyard
Waterfall
The Food Chain Blues
Snake Parade
Wolf
Animal Noises
What's the Matter?

Save the Future


Save the Future CD
Thanks to popular demand, World Bird Sanctuary's house band, The Raptor Project, has released its first CD, Save the Future. It consists of original songs about birds, the environment and taking care of our planet.

After years of sing-a-long and Birds in Concert performances, many requests from teachers, friends and WBS visitors inspired the project. The collection is made up of 13 songs, encoded lyrics on the CD and teacher activity pages. This recording is for everyone; kids, parents, teachers, young and old will find it fun and educational.

And, it fulfills the mission of WBS. All donations will go directly to the project and proceeds from every CD sold will go directly to our Wildlife Rehabilitation Hospital to provide care of injured wild birds of prey.

The CD is available for purchase for $12 with a $3.00 shipping and handling charge.

Raptor Project
TrackSample (click to play)
Save the Future
Wonderful Bird Song
Turkey Named Fred
The Vulture Song
Hawk of the Highway
Little Tree
Happy Bird Day
The Owl Song
Dodo
Roadkill Shiver
The Raven Song
Eagle Wind
Footsteps

Corporate Membership

Your customers and employees pay attention to what you’re doing in the community.

Becoming a Corporate Sponsor of World Bird Sanctuary shows your clients and your employees that you care about your impact on the environment. Corporate support is critical to the success of the World Bird Sanctuary, but sponsoring the World Bird Sanctuary is a great business decision for your company.

  • 84% of Americans say they are likely to switch brands, when price and quality are equal, to help support a cause.
  • 75% of Americans say a company’s commitment to causes is important when they decide which products and services to recommend to others.
  • Employees whose company’s support causes are 40% more likely to say that they are proud of their company’s values and nearly 25% more likely to be loyal to their employers.
  • (Source: 2002 Cone Corporate Citizenship Study)


Questions about Supporters? Call: (636) 861-3225 or email: sponsor@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Goodsearch

Do you want to help the World Bird Sanctuary but don't have the time or money to spare? Well now you can help us out by doing something you do every day, search the Internet.

GoodSearch is a search engine which donates 50 percent of its revenues to charities, schools and not-for-profit organizations like the World Bird Sanctuary. All you have to do is designate the World Bird Sanctuary as the organization you would like to support and GoodSearch does the rest. And since it is powered by Yahoo!, you know your searches will be accurate.

Click here to bookmark Goodsearch in your web browser


Beak to Beak

Beak to Beak

a book by Walter C. Crawford, Jr.


A book about Walter's musings on wildlife, conservation and life in general told through a collection of short, true-life stories.

The book is available for purchase for $10.

 

Return to the Wild

Return to the Wild

Take part in the release of a rehabilitated bird!

Returning a bird of prey back to the wild, can cost up to $1,000 in care and rehabilitation. Your contribution of only $150 helps our patients and gives you the opportunity to participate in the release of a wild bird of prey.

Invite family and friends to release a bird of prey at your home or nearby park. Celebrate a wedding, birthday, anniversary, family reunion, school or corporate function with this special gift.

The World Bird Sanctuary Wildlife Hospital is a cornerstone of the World Bird Sanctuary, and is entirely funded by donations from the public. Help us give our patients a second chance to fly. Sponsor a release today!


Questions about Return to the Wild? Call: (636) 861-1392 or email: rholloway@worldbirdsanctuary.org

WBS Friend Membership

WBS logo
Please show your support by becoming a Friend of World Bird Sanctuary! The World Bird Sanctuary receives no federal or state funding. We rely on donations from private businesses and individuals like you. Your donation will support: education and field study programs, the breeding and releasing of endangered species and the rehabilitation of injured raptors. The World Bird Sanctuary is a 501(c)(3), non profit, tax exempt organization.

Your WBS Friend Membership includes:

  • One year’s subscription to our newsletter – the Mews News – printed three times per year
  • Reusable WBS shopping bag
  • 10% discount on all World Bird Sanctuary merchandise in our gift shop
  • 10% discount on all public programs offered at World Bird Sanctuary, such as Owl Prowls, Nature Hikes etc.
  • Invitations to members-only events held at World Bird Sanctuary

Yes! I would like to show my support of World Bird Sanctuary by becoming a WBS Friend Today!

Individual Donation

Membership Options

Family Donation

(immediate only)
Membership Options

Group Donation

(25 people or less)
Membership Options

Couple Donation

Membership Options
Solution Graphics


For more information on becoming a WBS Friend call (636) 861-3225 or email: friend@worldbirdsanctuary.org

 

Support the World Bird Sanctuary

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Help World Bird Sanctuary save endangered bird species and their habitats today by making a one-time donation, or setting up a recurring monthly gift through PayPal.

One Time Donation

Yes, I want to help with my one time donation of:

Recurring Monthly Donation

Monthly automated donations through PayPal make budgeting easy! You can help the World Bird Sanctuary to achieve our goals while sticking to your giving budget.

$10 Monthly Donation

$20 Monthly Donation

$50 Monthly Donation

$100 Monthly Donation



This option is only available through a PayPal account. If you do not have a PayPal account you can sign up here www.paypal.com Your monthly donation will be deducted through PayPal. There is no contract - you can cancel this subscription at any time through your PayPal account.

Homing Pigeon Release

Homing Pigeon
Celebrate your Wedding, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Anniversary, Birthday, Memorial or other special occasion with the ultimate renewable resource: Homing Pigeons!

Create unforgettable memories at your next special occasion when the guests of honor release beautiful Homing Pigeons high into the sky or honor someone special with a symphony of flight as their spirit takes wing.

There's nothing like this earth-friendly experience. Homing Pigeons have an extraordinary homing capability and when released at your event will return home to the World Bird Sanctuary for release another day.

These creatures are unforgettable for your special occasion and are the ultimate renewable resource.

Releases are dependent on weather and therefore are not guaranteed.


For pricing and availability call (636) 225-4390 or email: education@worldbirdsanctuary.org

BIRDday Parties

Birdday Party
A great way to celebrate your birthday while supporting wildlife. Birdday parties include a 20-30 minute animal encounter, birthday cake, beverages and a gift for the birdday star.

This 90 minute party accommodates a maximum of 15 people.
All parties held at World Bird Sanctuary. Eagles available for additional cost.

 

50% non-refundable deposit required upon reservation.
Standard package*: $225* includes:
  • live animal encounter
  • birthday cake
  • beverages
  • a special gift for Birdday Star
  • *Add $10 per guest over first 15.
Deluxe package*: $325* includes:
  • all standard package items plus:
  • custom invitations
  • custom thank you cards and
  • gift bags for each guest
*Add $20 per guest over first 15.


*prices subject to change
For pricing and availability call (636) 225-4390 or email: education@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Field Trips

Guided Tour

Guided Tours

Allow one of our knowledgeable Naturalists to take you on a tour of our facilities. Learn about the past inhabitants of our area and meet our current residents. Tours last approximately 60 minutes. Maximum group size: 25 individuals

Bird Bundles

If you're looking for a children's activity to do while visiting, pick up a Bird Bundle. These packets are filled with activities to complete while visiting. All the materials necessary for completing the Bird Bundle are provided. Level 1 is available for 2nd grade and lower. Level 2 is available for 3rd grade and higher.

Birds Bugs and Bark

Join a Naturalist on a hike through the natural wooded habitat on the World Bird Sanctuary's property. Search for animals that live in our forest and learn how everything is interrelated. This program can be combined with other activities to accommodate a larger group. Maximum group size: 25 students.

Rock Hunt

Why are river rocks a particular shape and color? Take a trip to the Meramec River to examine rocks found in and near the water. Hike away from the water to see the changes in stones. Spend 45-60 minutes locating and determining the types of rocks found in the area. 5th grade and higher.

Bird in Hand

Ever wonder how and why birds are banded for identification? Get answers to these questions when you learn about mist-netting. Maximum group size depends on season. Can be combined with other activities for larger groups. Level 1: Kindergarten through 6th grade: Learn the basics of songbird identification and bird banding. Level 2: 7th grade and higher: Witness the banding of live birds and assist in collecting important information about each bird.

Freshwater Findings

Ponds support a huge variety of life, from microscopic plants to beavers. Visit World Bird Sanctuary's pond to see what aquatic life forms you can find and identify. Spend 45-60 minutes examining invertebrate samples and nets to discover what inhabits our pond. 5th grade and higher.


For pricing and availability call (636) 225-4390 or email: education@worldbirdsanctuary.org

 

World Bird Sanctuary Programs

Programs

Programs and Shows

A team of Naturalists offer an array of education programs covering a variety of environmental topics, presented in an interactive and entertaining style. Recognized for providing entertaining education programs, the World Bird Sanctuary presents seasonal shows and maintains displays at zoos, aquariums, theme parks, fairs and festivals throughout the year.

Office of Wildlife Learning

The Office of Wildlife learning offers environmental education programs that are developed in accordance with the state of Missouri's Show-Me Standards for education in life science.

Custom Programs

If you do not see a program that suits your exact needs, we can customize a program for your group.
For pricing and availability call (636) 225-4390 or email: education@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Call up to a year in advance to reserve the program and date of your choice.

 

Nature Center and Gift Shop


Nature Center
Nature Center

The World Bird Sanctuary's Nature Center is open daily from 8-5.

The World Bird Sanctuary's nature center houses a variety of birds, mammals and reptiles for visitors to view and learn about. These animals are on display daily and may include parrots from around the world (including the Thick Billed Parrot - the only parrot native to the United States), snakes such as "Kahn", the 12 foot Albino Burmese Python, "Shuttle", the Russian Tortoise and "Inca", the Guinea Pig.

Be sure to step out onto our viewing deck behind the Nature Center to visit with our variety of raptors enjoying their day in one of weathering areas. Here you may see a Eurasian Eagle Owl (the largest species of owl in the world), a White Necked Raven (listen closely you just might hear her talk, whistle or imitate an owl), the fastest creature in the world, the Peregrine Falcon, and much more. All set with our oak hickory forest as the background.

Access is provided by a carefully designed path with hand railing and lighting. There is also a special needs access trail that is paved, equipped with handrails and lighting.

The Raptique Gift Shop

is located at the Nature Center and offers nature-themed apparel, books, jewelry, toys and much more.

Purchase these gifts today!

World Bird Sanctuary Site Map

Exhibits

Exhibits

Outdoor Display Enclosures

Our large outdoor avian exhibits provide housing for a variety of WBS' non-releasable birds. These large enclosures allow these magnificent birds a comfortable place to live out their lives. These enclosures provide exhibit space for a variety of species, which vary depending on the season.

Raptor Exhibits

Live Raptor exhibits such as Bald Eagles, Red-Tailed Hawks, Peregrine Falcons, Eurasian Eagle Owls and much more!

Picnic Pavilions

Pack a picnic breakfast, lunch or snack and enjoy it under one of our picnic shelters on Songbird Lane. We have surrounded the shelters with bird feeders, birdbaths and a butterfly garden, so you can enjoy the birds while you eat. You will also find nearby: McDonald's, Steak 'n Shake, Denny's, Culvers, Bob Evans, Cracker Barrel, Krispy Kreme, Ruby Tuesdays, Taco Bell & Burger King.

Hiking Trails

Hickory Trail at the World Bird Sanctuary extends 1/2 mile. This trail is perfect for wildlife watching and is available only to hikers.

Educational Programs

Entertaining education programs such as Raptor Awareness, Reptiles, Creatures of Myth and Legend, Sing-a-Longs and much more (pre-registration required & fees charged for all programs)

More than Birds!

Many other exciting creatures on display such as reptiles, parrots, insects, homing pigeons, two rabbits and a Guinea Pig

Nearby Attractions

What's Nearby? Lone Elk County Park, Six Flags St. Louis, Hurricane Harbor, Wild Canid Research & Survival Center, and Chubb Trail

Internship Program

Interns
We are looking for reliable, enthusiastic, motivated individuals, who can work well independently and as part of a team. Our internship program runs year round and is in high demand. Please call today to find out about available openings & schedules.

General Internship

Interns will experience all aspects of the World Bird Sanctuary by assisting the staff with the:
  • Captive management of resident birds
  • Daily husbandry duties
  • Maintenance of facilities
  • Rehabilitation of injured birds
  • Public education programs through the Office of Wildlife Learning
  • Interacting with the public at the Visitor Center
  • Field identification of birds & documentation of behaviors
Qualification Requirements
  • Must be capable of rigorous outdoor work in all types of weather conditions
  • Transportation is recommended
  • Minimum of 18 years old
  • College degree or working towards a degree is recommended, but not required.
  • WBS internships may count toward possible credit at many colleges or universities, consult with your advisor or registrar to find out if you can receive credit.
Other Information
Furnished housing (coed) and utilities will be provided. All interns must complete a special project.
To Apply
To apply for an internship please complete Internship Application at right with your resume, a cover letter stating your career goals and how this internship will help you achieve those goals, three letters of reference and WBS' Intern Application.

Social Media and Fundraising Internship

World Bird Sanctuary has a vacancy for a social media and fundraising intern to assist the Development Department with online marketing and fundraising projects. This internship is available for a 90 day period.
Job Duties
Reporting to the Director of Development, this internship will provide the candidate with valuable experience in targeted social media engagement and fundraising. To earn this experience, the job duties will include:
  • Research and gather relevant information that engages users of our selected social media platforms
  • Developing highly effective, original and targeted marketing copy
  • Understand what works and what doesn't in the world of social media (Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest)
  • Research crowd funding sites and draft proposals to be submitted for funding
  • Must be willing and able to work around tight deadlines
  • The ability to research and write on daily deadlines
  • Ability to through problems and producing solutions
  • Turn research into posts ready for publishing
  • Develop and present ideas to enhance the awareness and popularity of the selected social media platforms
  • Carry out other fundraising and social media projects as assigned by the Director of Development
Candidate Requirements:
  • A strong passion and natural ability for writing
  • Possess the ability to articulate clearly, in writing
  • Strong attention to detail and organization
  • Commitment to producing the best results you are able
  • Excitement about the social media and crowdfunding phenomenon and desire to become an expert on the subject
  • Completed degree or working toward a degree in digital communication, non-profit administration or fundraising
Compensation
This is a full-time internship. The position is unpaid. Class credit is possible, as long as requirements for credits are worked out with your school in advance of the start of the internship. Shared intern housing available.
To Apply
To apply, please send a resume and cover letter to credfern@worldbirdsanctuary.org with the dates that you are available.


Questions about the Internship Program? Call: (636) 861-1392 or email: intern@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Old Volunteer Program

Volunteer
A volunteer is a person who willingly and without pay gives their own time, expertise and talents. Volunteers are vital to the success of the World Bird Sanctuary and are welcomed as family. Our volunteer program offers something for everyone, including the unique opportunity to work directly with birds and animals. The minimum requirement is 16 hours of work per month. Previous animal experience is not required and all training is done on-site. All volunteers are required to become a WBS Friend.

Junior volunteers have the opportunity to assist with daily chores in the education and animal management departments. This position allows young aspiring naturalist to be in a safe proximity to the animals, while learning about conservation and animal care. Applicants must be at least 13 years old and 16 years old to handle birds of prey.

Positions Available

Naturalist Assist the Office of Wildlife Learning staff with the presentation of education programs to help the public and the maintenance of all education animals. Help maintain exhibits and displays and answer questions from the public. This position requires the handing of animals and outdoor work.
Animal Care Technician Assist the staff in our behind the scenes area with the husbandry and care of exotic birds, amazing raptors and breeding birds. Husbandry duties may include food preparations, cleaning facilities, assisting with animal training and general maintenance. This position requires the handling of animals and outdoor work.
Rehabilitation Technician Assist the staff at our avian hospital with the care, treatment, feeding, cleaning and medicating of birds undergoing rehabilitation. This position requires the handling of birds and outdoor work.
Docent Work at the visitor information, nature centers or display areas. Welcome and guide visitors with a brief overview of the property. This position does NOT require the handing of animals or birds, but does require outdoor work.
Field Studies Technician Assist the Field Studies Department with the ongoing study of on-site wild bird populations. This includes visual and auditory observations, mist netting songbirds and nest box studies. This position is seasonal for 1 day a week and requires outdoor work.
Clerical Assist the staff at the World Bird Sanctuary offices with answering phones, data entry, filing and other generic office work. This position does NOT require the handling of animals, birds or outdoor work.

Propagation Department

Propagation

About

The Propagation Department of the World Bird Sanctuary is an extremely busy department. Eggs, hatchlings, fledglings and parents require a significant amount of care and observation.

We have successfully bred: Eagle Owls, European Barn Owls, Common Barn Owls, Spectacled Owls, Mottled Owls, Tawny Owls, Golden Eagles, Bald Eagles, Egyptian Vultures, Andean Condors, Black Vultures, Turkey Vultures, King Vultures, Peregrine Falcons, Saker Falcons, Lanner Falcons, European Kestrels, Savannah Hawks, Great Black Hawks, Cooper's Hawks, Red-Tailed Hawks, Thick-Billed Parrots, African Pied Crows, White-Naped Raven, Abdim's Storks, Red-Legged Seriemas and White-Tailed Sea Eagles. We are proud be the first in North America to hatch Wedge-Tailed Eagles and Augur Buzzards.


Propogation

Baby Birds

If you find a baby bird, do not remove it from its nesting area unless you are certain it is injured. Young birds will stray from the nest as they are learning to fly; if you know where the nest is, you can safely put the baby directly back in the nest and the parents will continue to care for it. If you can't reach the nest, put the baby on a high branch in the same tree. It's a myth that parent birds will reject a baby because of the scent on our hands - most birds have no sense of smell at all!

Falcon Re-Introduction

The World Bird Sanctuary has long been involved in the preservation of threatened and endangered bird species. Due to the pesticide DDT, the Peregrine Falcon was on the brink of extinction, but the efforts of dedicated conservation organizations, like the World Bird Sanctuary, have offered the Peregrine Falcon a second chance. In 1991 WBS celebrated the hatching of the first wild Peregrine Falcon chick in Missouri in over 100 years. The parents were released years earlier by WBS. Efforts continue throughout the St. Louis area to reestablish wild populations of this valuable species. "Hack" boxes, or man-made nests located high above the ground, house young peregrines. WBS staff care for the youngsters until they are ready to leave the "nest".
Questions about Propagation? Call: (636) 861-3260 or email: prop@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Executive Director - Walter Crawford

Biography

Walter spent his boyhood years in Venezuela, where his father worked as a field engineer for a petroleum company. The exotic birds in the jungles of South America caught the attention of the young boy and his interest in them eventually led Crawford to his life's work - the propagation, rescue, rehabilitation, and preservation of birds, especially birds of prey. Crawford, a Vietnam veteran, received a bachelor's degree from Southeast Missouri State University and a master's degree from Mississippi State University. With the blessing and support of the Zoo's Director Emeritus, Marlin Perkins, in 1977 Crawford founded what eventually came to be known as the World Bird Sanctuary. In 1982 he left the zoo to work full-time at the sanctuary. The work being done by Crawford and the rest of the World Bird Sanctuary staff has been enhanced by the opening of the World Bird Sanctuary's 105 acre nature park in 2000. Under Crawford's direction the World Bird Sanctuary is headquarters for an exciting combination of rescue, rehabilitation, research and education.

Achievements

  • 1st captive breeding of the Bateleur Eagle
  • 1st captive breeding of the Mottled Owl
  • 1982 Conservationist of the Year
  • 1984 Conservation Organization of the Year
  • Distinguished Alumni Awards - Southeast MO State - School of Polytechnic Studies and Agriculture Department
  • 1993 Lifetime Achievement Award - Wildlife Rehabilitation Association
  • 1994 Gorilla, Gorilla, Gorilla Award - Zoological Society of Milwaukee County
  • 1997 International Achievement Award - International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council
  • 1999 Conservation Award & Community Service Award - National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution
  • Certificate of Award for Conservation & Conservation Award of Exceptional Merit - Missouri State Society
  • Award of Appreciation - US Army Corps of Engineers
  • 1991 appointed Curator of Ornithology & Avian Research - Guyana Zoo in Georgetown
  • Member of the Explorers Club
  • Founder & Vice-President of the National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association
  • Past President - International Association of Avian Trainers and Educators

Location and Hours

WORLD BIRD SANCTUARY
125 Bald Eagle Ridge Road
Valley Park, MO 63088

 

Hours

Daily 8am - 5pm
Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas

Entry to World Bird Sanctuary is free.  Free parking.
(636) 225-4390 ext. 0

Wildlife Hospital

Tours Available
1st Saturday of the month at noon - $5 donation

Absolutely No Dogs Allowed

Please abide by this rule for the safety of our birds, who cannot tell that a dog on a leash is not a threat to them. 
They react to the perceived threat by flying into the sides of their cages, hurting themselves.

Winter Advisory

If it has snowed in the St. Louis area in the last 10 days please call ahead and make sure that we are open.  Our site is not paved and we are unable to plow or salt our gravel roads and walkways.  Icy conditions can persist for about 10 days after it has snowed.

Directions

World Bird Sanctuary is located just off the intersection of Interstate 44 and Route 141 in Valley Park. Be sure to look for the state highway signs on Interstate 44 and Route 141 to find us.

From Downtown St. Louis

Take I-44 west to exit #272 (Valley Park/Route 141).  At the light go right, then make another immediate right.  At the stop sign, make a left onto the North Outer Rd.  Follow this 2.6 miles to the World Bird Sanctuary’s entrance on the right.  If you get to Motomart,you have gone to far.

From the Airport

Take I-70 west to I-270 south to I-44 west.  Take exit #272 (Valley Park/Route 141).  At the light go right, then make another immediate right.  At the stop sign, make a left onto the North Outer Rd.  Follow this 2.6 miles to the World Bird Sanctuary’s entrance on the right.  If you get to Motomart,you have gone to far.

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Contact Us

WORLD BIRD SANCTUARY
125 Bald Eagle Ridge Road
Valley Park, MO 63088

Phone: (636) 225-4390 ext. 0
Fax: (636) 861-3240

Department

General Information(636) 225-4390 ext. 0Mon-Sun 8am-5pm
Executive Offices(636) 861-3225info@worldbirdsanctuary.org
Education/Office of Wildlife Learning:(636) 225-4390education@worldbirdsanctuary.org
Rehabilitation:(636) 861-1392rehab@worldbirdsanctuary.org
Propagation:(636) 861-3260prop@worldbirdsanctuary.org
 
Sponsorship & Development:(636) 225-4390, ext. 102sponsor@worldbirdsanctuary.org
Press Info/Promotions:(636) 225-4390, ext. 102promo@worldbirdsanctuary.org
 
Adopt-A-Bird:(636) 861-3225adopt@worldbirdsanctuary.org
WBS Friends:(636) 861-3225friend@worldbirdsanctuary.org
 
Internships:(636) 861-1392intern@worldbirdsanctuary.org
Volunteers:(636) 225-4390, ext. 103volunteer@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Field Studies


The World Bird Sanctuary’s Field Studies Staff are dedicated individuals with biology, wildlife management or related degrees. Each individual is well educated in the visual and auditory identification of avian species in the field.

Our Three Phase Program for Wildlife Area Enhancement

Habitat Assessment

The first step of any project generally includes the evaluation of the property in question.  WBS field staff are able to provide an overall assessment of biodiversity, habitat quality, critical habitat identification and the presence or absence of federally or state identified endangered or threatened species as well as species of special concern.

Habitat assessment typically takes 1-12 months depending on the scope of the project. This incorporates the birds that use the area as breeding grounds, wintering grounds as well as the species that use the area as a rest stop during migration. To establish a population size or assess the impact of a project on a population requires a lengthier study.

Conservation Consultation

After a thorough assessment of the property has been completed, senior WBS field staff will develop various comprehensive habitat management plans taking into account the current and proposed land use. The identification of habitat restoration and/or enhancement opportunities can be made at this time.

Habitat Management

WBS is experienced in the development of long term habitat management programs designed to maintain an increased overall habitat quality. Based on goals and objectives developed during consultations, a detailed management plan can be put together including design, construction oversight and long term monitoring and maintenance regimes. When properly implemented, such a plan is integral to the success of any project and may bring other benefits such as increased aesthetic value and potential reductions in maintenance costs.

Depending on the nature of the project WBS is also experienced in the development of educational programs
and can assist in the development of site-specific educational material.

Recognition

The World Bird Sanctuary (WBS) is internationally recognized as a first-class conservation organization and has consulted on many projects for zoological institutions including international entities such as the Ecuador Zoological Park and the Guyana Zoological Park. WBS' environmental consultants have experience working with numerous government organizations including the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Missouri Department of Conservation, Missouri Department of Natural Resources, United States Air Force, Conservation on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and many others.


Questions about Field Studies? Call: (636) 861-1392 or email: fieldstudy@worldbirdsanctuary.org

Wildlife Hospital

Ill or Injured Birds

If you find an ill or injured bird of prey, please read the information below or call us at (636) 861-1392.

What to do if you find a baby bird?
What to do if you find a sick or injured bird of prey?

What You Should Do

When attempting to capture an injured bird of prey for transport, be extremely cautious of their feet and talons. Wear gloves and cover the bird with a thick blanket and place it immediately in a pet carrier or cardboard box that can be closed securely. Do not attempt to care for the bird yourself. Bring it immediately to a Wildlife Hospital.

    Wildlife Hospital


About the Hospital

In 2005, WBS officially opened the doors to the Wildlife Hospital. Through the years WBS has been called upon by many government agencies to assist in the rescue and relocation of smuggled and confiscated animals.

The Wildlife Hospital provided the World Bird Sanctuary with its first state-of-the-art facility, in which to conduct a valuable aspect of its mission - rehabilitation. Treating over 300 patients each year, this building greatly enhances our rehabilitation efforts.  The World Bird Sanctuary's active program to assist distressed raptors from Missouri and throughout the U.S. is run by volunteer veterinarians and an experienced rehabilitation staff, assisted by volunteers and interns. These dedicated individuals release as many raptors as possible back into the wild to live out their natural lives.

Treatment & Care

The rehabilitation of a single injured bird of prey costs up to $1000. Over 300 patients are treated each year at the Wildlife Hospital. The staff at the Wildlife Hospital begin the treatment of an injured bird of prey by stabilizing the condition in order to counter the effects of shock and stress caused by the injury. After the bird’s condition is stable, the bird receives additional medical care from local charitable veterinarians.  Tube feedings, daily medication, topical antibiotic applications and re-dressing of wounds are some of the daily treatments given.

Preparing for a Release

After the bird of prey is phyically well a program of physical conditioning begins. This often involves manipulation of the wings and feet to strengthen and stetch atropied muscles. The bird of prey is placed in a large flight cage that allows for flying long distances. Flying a bird of prey on a long nylon line in an open field is often used as well.

Want to Help?

The Wildlife Hospital is entirely funded by donations from the public. Help us give our patients a second chance to fly.
Sponsor a release today!


Questions about the Wildlife Hospital? Call: (636) 861-1392 or email: rehab@worldbirdsanctuary.org

About the World Bird Sanctuary

World Bird Sanctuary

The World Bird Sanctuary is both a unique St. Louis attraction and entertaining environmental education opportunity. With over 305 acres and over 200 animals in our care, we offer a one-of-a-kind wildlife experience. The World Bird Sanctuary’s mission is to preserve the earth’s biological diversity and to secure the future of threatened bird species in their natural environments. We work to fulfill that mission through education, captive breeding, field studies and rehabilitation.

WBS operates under the leadership of Executive Director Walter C. Crawford, Jr. along with dedicated staff, volunteers, interns and an active Board of Directors. Crawford directs the daily operations of the sanctuary, but is responsible to the Board of Directors in all matters, ensuring that WBS is above reproach in this field. The sanctuary employs a full time staff of 18 and hires approximately 25 part time employees each year. The most important aspect of WBS is, beyond a doubt, its staff and volunteers. They are individuals who have dedicated their lives to wildlife conservation and the mission of the sanctuary. They are also the reason for this organization’s success.

The World Bird Sanctuary is one of North America’s largest facilities for the conservation of birds. WBS is on the leading edge of public awareness regarding the plight of bird species worldwide.

History

Founder - Walter Crawford

Walter spent his boyhood years in Venezuela, where his father worked as a field engineer for a petroleum company. The exotic birds in the jungles of South America caught the attention of the young boy and his interest in them eventually led Crawford to his life's work - the propagation, rescue, rehabilitation, and preservation of birds, especially birds of prey. Crawford, a Vietnam veteran, received a bachelor's degree from Southeast Missouri State University and a master's degree from Mississippi State University. With the blessing and support of the Zoo's Director Emeritus, Marlin Perkins, in 1977 Crawford founded what eventually came to be known as the World Bird Sanctuary. In 1982 he left the zoo to work full-time at the sanctuary. The work being done by Crawford and the rest of the World Bird Sanctuary staff has been enhanced by the opening of the World Bird Sanctuary's 105 acre nature park in 2000. Under Crawford's direction the World Bird Sanctuary is headquarters for an exciting combination of rescue, rehabilitation, research and education.

Achievements

  • 1st captive breeding of the Bateleur Eagle
  • 1st captive breeding of the Mottled Owl
  • 1982 Conservationist of the Year
  • 1984 Conservation Organization of the Year
  • Distinguished Alumni Awards - Southeast MO State - School of Polytechnic Studies and Agriculture Department
  • 1993 Lifetime Achievement Award - Wildlife Rehabilitation Association
  • 1994 Gorilla, Gorilla, Gorilla Award - Zoological Society of Milwaukee County
  • 1997 International Achievement Award - International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council
  • 1999 Conservation Award & Community Service Award - National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution
  • Certificate of Award for Conservation & Conservation Award of Exceptional Merit - Missouri State Society
  • Award of Appreciation - US Army Corps of Engineers
  • 1991 appointed Curator of Ornithology & Avian Research - Guyana Zoo in Georgetown
  • Member of the Explorers Club
  • Founder & Vice-President of the National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association
  • Past President - International Association of Avian Trainers and Educators


History

Roots

Originally named the Raptor Rehabilitation & Propagation Project (RRPP), the World Bird Sanctuary's roots are deep. The land that housed the RRPP formerly belonged to the U.S. Army, who used the area as a munitions depot during WWII. Many of RRPP's first bird buildings were old Army facilities. "A" Barn, as this building was called, was used to house RRPP's breeding department. The U.S. Army's Administration Offices were initially housed in this facility. "D" Barn had a special purpose for RRPP. It provided housing for injured eagles brought to RRPP that, due to the nature of their injuries, were unable to be released back into the wild. While the U.S. Army was in residence they used the facility as their shower/latrine facility for the nearby barracks.